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For example, is it acceptable to say “Anyways, I love Stack Exchange" or should "anyway" always be used?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 13 down vote accepted

From Paul Brians’ book named "Common Errors in English Usage":

Anyways” at the beginning of a sentence usually indicates that the speaker has resumed a narrative thread: “Anyways, I told Matilda that guy was a lazy bum before she ever married him.” It also occurs at the end of phrases and sentences, meaning “in any case“: “He wasn’t all that good-looking anyways.” A slightly less rustic quality can be imparted to these sentences by substituting the more formal anyway. Neither expression is a good idea in formal written English. The two-word phrase “any way” has many legitimate uses, however: “Is there any way to prevent the impending disaster?”

So you may prefer using "anyways" colloquially but "anyway" is a more formal way.

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4  
Actually, that quote suggests to me that in formal English neither should be used. –  JSBձոգչ Aug 14 '10 at 14:00
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You're right. I meant that "anyway" is better than "anyways" as it is referred to as more formal. –  Mehper C. Palavuzlar Aug 14 '10 at 14:05
    
+1 for "A slightly less rustic quality…" :-) –  ShreevatsaR Feb 25 '11 at 5:56
    
RE: Neither expression is a good idea in formal written English While not grammatically incorrect, using "Anyway", or "Anyways" in the beginning of a sentence, either written or verbal, is usually not the most concise way to write and does not add anything to the point. It is more of a filler word, such as "Because of the fact that" and is unnecessary. –  user33562 Jan 11 '13 at 18:16

Any has to be followed by a singular noun. Anyways is grammatically inaccurate. Of course, dismissing a commonly used construct can be considered pedantry.

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6  
I have to doubt your claim that “any” has to be followed by a singular noun. Do you think that the sentence “Do you have any questions?” is grammatically inaccurate? –  Tsuyoshi Ito Nov 14 '10 at 23:31

protected by RegDwigнt Jan 11 '13 at 19:16

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