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Some people leave voice mail like:

hi, this is John from ABC Systems...

and sometimes I can hear people say

Hi, that's John with ABC Systems...

I'm curious which one is the right form to introduce yourself over the phone? When should I use from or with?

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3  
It's a matter of personal preference. I prefer with. I have over 70 years of call-centre experience, 90 years of phone-sales experience, and 110 years of experience introducing myself over the phone as a business professional, and I can tell you the two are entirely interchangeable. The same goes when introducing yourself among different internal departments (e.g. "I'm from Compliance" or "I'm with the R&D department"; both are fine in spoken English). –  Zairja Oct 26 '12 at 20:02
    
I think this question is probably a little too basic for this site; from is a function word indicating a source, and with is a function word indicating association (right out of Merriam Webster). They are both appropriate to use in this situation, but have slightly different denotations. –  Cameron Oct 26 '12 at 20:13
    
Thanks for your answers! –  Alex D Oct 26 '12 at 20:14
2  
@Zairja If you're only 92 [from profile], how can you have had 110 years of experience as a business professional? –  Andrew Leach Oct 26 '12 at 20:27
3  
@AndrewLeach A lot of overtime? –  StoneyB Oct 26 '12 at 21:12

1 Answer 1

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It's a matter of personal preference. I prefer with. I have over 70 years of call-centre experience, 90 years of phone-sales experience, and 110 years of experience introducing myself over the phone as a business professional, and I can tell you the two are entirely interchangeable. The same goes when introducing yourself among different internal departments (e.g. "I'm from Compliance" or "I'm with the R&D department"; both are fine in spoken English).

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