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I am confused with the correct usage of in which vs. where in the following example:

However, this pros, is limited for the objets where an edge resides perpendicular to the ridge-line and connects via two other edges.

I feel I should use in which instead of where.

Which is grammatical? Are both?

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closed as not a real question by FumbleFingers, MετάEd, Marthaª, Mitch, tchrist Oct 27 '12 at 12:04

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The use of where refers to the case as in 'in such a case'; in which refers to the "objects" directly. They are both correct, not the same, and are not interchangeable. –  Kris Oct 26 '12 at 5:02
    
This question is in jeopardy of being closed and eventually deleted for lack of research. Please see the FAQ especially the link to "how to ask a good question". If improved the question can always be reopened. –  MετάEd Oct 26 '12 at 14:58

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

They're both grammatical and they're both used in all registers. It's a style choice. Sometimes one is better than the other. And sometimes there's another choice:

(A) Smallville, the town in which I was raised, was boring.
(B) Smallville, the town where I was raised, was boring.
(C) Smallville, the town I was raised in, was boring.

(A) is a bit stiff and not what most native speakers would say or write in most cases. It's very formal. (B) and (C) are more informal and more frequently.

The sentence you've provided, However, this pros, is limited for the objets where an edge resides perpendicular to the ridge-line and connects via two other edges is both ungrammatical and incomprehensible unless I change two of the words to make it mean something (to me, but but it may be what you want the sentence to say):

However, this process, is limited for the objects where an edge resides perpendicular to the ridge-line and connects via two other edges.

This still has usage, punctuation, and maybe semantic problems. Perhaps it should be this:

However, this process is limited to objects with an edge that is perpendicular to the ridge-line and connects via two other edges.

or this:

However, this process is limited for objects with an edge that is perpendicular to the ridge-line and connects via two other edges.

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In your final case perhaps "However, this process is limited for _those_objects with an edge that is perpendicular to the ridge-line and connects via two other edges." –  Fortiter Oct 26 '12 at 0:44
    
Perhaps. The first case means that the process is restricted to the described objects; the second case means either that it doesn't work for all of the described objects or that it works only partially for the described objects. If adding those makes this clearer, then I'm all for it. Thank you. –  user21497 Oct 26 '12 at 0:52
1  
I suspect OP has far more to worry about than just whether to go for objets where/in which/with/having/etc., and I'm not sure there's much to be gained from trying to find out exactly what he wants to say. –  FumbleFingers Oct 26 '12 at 3:35
    
@Bill Franke: many thanks... yes it is good to know the correct way.. understood the difference how to 'use' to and 'for' –  gnp Oct 26 '12 at 9:35

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