Take the 2-minute tour ×
English Language & Usage Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for linguists, etymologists, and serious English language enthusiasts. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Migrated: http://linguistics.stackexchange.com/questions/2752/help-me-convert-the-english-phonetic-alphabet-to-gregg-shorthand#comment7397_2752

I've found a several descriptive images of the various ways to write all of the sounds of the English Roman Alphabet in Gregg Shorthand, but what I have not been able to find is a way to write all of the sounds of American English in Gregg shorthand; therefore, I'm seeking a resource or a person who can answer me this: how do I write all of the sounds of the IPA in Gregg Shorthand?

Please, use this IPA chart (thanks to a Wikipedia submission), which is pretty comprehensive, as a template, if you plan to manually go through it.

The reason I ask: I can find examples of all the sounds of IPA, but I cannot find examples of all the sounds of Gregg. If I can find audio samples of all of the Gregg Shorthand symbols, I think that I can make a list with confidence and resubmit a clean answer. So, also if anyone has a resource with phonetic examples of all of the Gregg Shorthand symbols, please post that as a comment or answer.

This chart:

This chart represents my own attempt to correlate these sounds. It took a long time to create, but feel free to bash it. The red are the ones I'm really in the dark about, and I don't think that any of the vowel sounds are correct.

As far as ʏ is concerned, I could not find an IPA character for "you/yew", but there is a Gregg character for it.

share|improve this question

closed as off topic by J.R., Jim, KitFox Oct 24 '12 at 12:51

Questions on English Language & Usage Stack Exchange are expected to relate to English language and usage within the scope defined by the community. Consider editing the question or leaving comments for improvement if you believe the question can be reworded to fit within the scope. Read more about reopening questions here.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
This might be more suitable for Stack Exchange Linguistics linguistics.stackexchange.com/?as=1 –  Barrie England Oct 24 '12 at 10:36
    
@BarrieEngland I've restricted my answer to English. Gregg Shorthand is for English. It would be nice to fork it onto Linguistics, though. Is it possible to fork? –  Wolfpack'08 Oct 24 '12 at 10:37
1  
John Lawler has a deleted comment: "You might consider the Shavian alphabet, which is phonemic for English, and resembles Gregg somewhat. It's designed to be written rapidly, at least. For a list of the English phonemes, see here" –  KitFox Oct 24 '12 at 11:50
    
@Wolfpack'08 It doesn't matter if it's restricted to a single language, you can ask on Linguistics, I'm one of the moderators there. The problem is that you're asking us to help you make this alphabet. This is not fit for the Q&A format, and it'd be better to rephrase your question to ask for references that might help you do it, that would be ok. –  Alenanno Oct 24 '12 at 12:38
add comment

Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.