Take the 2-minute tour ×
English Language & Usage Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for linguists, etymologists, and serious English language enthusiasts. It's 100% free, no registration required.

You could get on developing this project and help me to add more features to that.

share|improve this question
add comment

5 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I would use

You could go on developing this project and help me add more features to it.

or (as @BarrieEngland suggested)

You could get on with developing this project and help me with adding more features to it.

But I do believe that they are all technically valid.

share|improve this answer
add comment

It might be heard, but get on with is perhaps more usual.

share|improve this answer
    
so the correct phrase is: "you could get on with developing this project and help me to add more features to that" ? –  Learn English Oct 23 '12 at 10:42
    
I don't say that one is more 'correct' than the other. I just say that you're more likely to find get on with. If you're a foreign learner, that's the construction you should use, but bear in mind that it is colloquial. –  Barrie England Oct 23 '12 at 11:21
add comment
  1. You could get on developing this project
  2. and help me to add more features to that.

The second part seems to suggest that the get on phrase is used in the sense get/ come on board.

You could join this team developing the project and help me to add more features to it.
Or
You could join us in developing the project and help me to add more features to it.

share|improve this answer
    
but there is not any team. there is a project that i created and want to say that others can work on that. –  Learn English Oct 23 '12 at 11:02
    
That should be no issue. The sentence I provided is an example, only to show the meaning. See the edit. –  Kris Oct 23 '12 at 11:18
add comment

Maybe what you're tring to say is "Help me add more features to the application (?) by joining the development team."

share|improve this answer
add comment

Sounds rather colloquial to me. There is a preposition missing and "to get on with" is usually followed by a noun, whereas to continue, which can be used as a synonym, can be followed by the gerund.

get on with the development of this project...

continue developing this project

I'm not sure the end of the sentence is very idiomatic, is "that" the project? If so, I would use "it" instead of "that"

share|improve this answer
    
yes, "that" is "the project". –  Learn English Oct 23 '12 at 10:57
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.