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I wonder what it means by "there has to be a larger and larger conspiracy among something or somebody to do something"? What is the implication? Does it imply that "something or somebody to do something" is unlikely to happen, because the only explanation for it is a conspiracy?

For example,

there has to be a larger and larger conspiracy, as it were, among the samples to keep deviating from the expectation in the same way

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closed as not a real question by FumbleFingers, Mark Beadles, MετάEd, Kris, StoneyB Oct 21 '12 at 17:28

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
Can you be specific about which part you are confuses you? –  Ataraxia Oct 19 '12 at 20:42
    
Yes. Does it imply that "something or somebody to do something" is unlikely to happen, because the only explanation for it is a conspiracy? –  Tim Oct 19 '12 at 20:43
    
-1 because the link you posted doesn't even include the word "conspiracy". And vote to close because it's General Reference that "There has to be X" means "The only possible explanation is that there is X", as pointed out by Chris. –  FumbleFingers Oct 19 '12 at 21:15
    
Sorry, the link should be masi.cscs.lsa.umich.edu/~crshalizi/notabene/… –  Tim Oct 19 '12 at 21:17
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2 Answers 2

This is just flaccid, sloppy writing not reflective of general usage. Notice that if you remove the hedge phrase "as it were" (perhaps, in this instance, the academic version of "like" or "you know"?), conspiracy seems to be a very silly word to use:

there has to be a larger and larger conspiracy among the samples to keep deviating from the expectation in the same way

From this perspective it looks like samples are being personified, as though they were the Lee Harvey Oswald of statistics.

I can't find the original sentence in the link you provided, so I actually find it quite unclear what's being suggested about these samples.

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Thanks! Search for "keep deviating from the expectation in the same way" in the link, you will find the context. –  Tim Oct 19 '12 at 20:59
    
Sorry, the link should be masi.cscs.lsa.umich.edu/~crshalizi/notabene/… –  Tim Oct 19 '12 at 21:17
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"There has to be" means "The only possible explanation is that there is". So "the only possible explanation is that there is a conspiracy".

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Does it mean the thing is unlikely to happen, because the only explanation for it is a consipracy? –  Tim Oct 19 '12 at 20:40
    
I read it as a given. It's established that the samples are deviating. Searching for an explanation, only a conspiracy could be the answer. –  Chris Schiffhauer Oct 19 '12 at 20:44
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