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I saw an advertising poster on a Samsung shop that was saying "iPhone 5, because you have more money than sense".

But I don't get it, is that even a correct sentence?

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closed as general reference by J.R., tchrist, coleopterist, MετάEd, Marthaª Oct 15 '12 at 19:53

This question is too basic; it can be definitively and permanently answered by a single link to a standard internet reference source designed specifically to find that type of information.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
Samsung is a top competitor against Apple (maker of the iPhone). The ad implies that iPhones are expensive but a poor product choice. Someone who buys one has more money than sense ("sound mental capacity and understanding typically marked by shrewdness and practicality"). As an ad, it doesn't need to be a grammatical complete sentence. –  Zairja Oct 15 '12 at 18:07
    
but is it a grammatically correct sentence too? –  Altima Oct 15 '12 at 18:11
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It's not a sentence, it's an Advertising slogan, which need be no more than a phrase. –  StoneyB Oct 15 '12 at 18:13
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2 Answers 2

It is grammatically correct, but it is a phrase, not a sentence. It is saying that you have more money than you have sense (which as Zairja said in the above comments, "sound mental capacity and understanding typically marked by shrewdness and practicality", couldn't have put it better myself).

An important thing to note about this is that there is a difference between something being grammatically correct, and being a complete sentence. It is merely a subordinate clause, but a grammatically correct one. In the case of advertisement, this is commonly done. The part that's "missing" for it to be a complete sentence is an implied "buy the iPhone 5", or even "you would buy the iPhone 5".

(You would buy the iPhone 5) because you have more money than sense.

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I think the full sentence is something like "(Our competitor thinks you will buy its product) because you have more money than sense." –  Malvolio Oct 15 '12 at 18:25
    
@Malvolio edited, thanks for the clarification –  Ataraxia Oct 15 '12 at 18:29
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But I don't get it, is that even a correct sentence?

No, it's a sentence fragment. It's short for something like "You should buy an iPhone 5, because you have more money than sense."

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