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The context of the word groove here is musical groove. In youth slang of electronic music fans it means aesthetic pleasure while listening to music.

Can I use groove as a transitive verb? As in, "X is grooving me", or even on itself?

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Is there a sentence or paragraph of context where you've read/heard this? As is, it sounds a little strange all by itself. –  Mitch Oct 10 '12 at 13:35
    
Maybe these: "This sounds is grooving me", or "Grooving me" if the view from the outside on myself... –  Semyon Vyskubov Oct 10 '12 at 13:40
    
Except in the sense "interact, maintain or improve relations with business associates, a person, or a situation", I find it only as an intransitive verb in [UD] (urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=groove). –  StoneyB Oct 10 '12 at 13:46

1 Answer 1

The way the word groove is defined/ understood is such that it denotes (1)n. a sense of feeling on the part of someone. (2) v. to cause such a feeling in someone.

Even so, it cannot be used transitively as in a piece of music grooving someone. The music grooves; the listener grooves (in different ways). Nothing grooves another.

As a noun:
Groove (music) (Wikipedia)
"Groove is the sense of propulsive rhythmic "feel" or sense of "swing" created by the interaction of the music ..."
"...a "groove" is an "understanding of rhythmic patterning" or "feel" and "an intuitive sense" of "a cycle in motion" that emerges from "carefully aligned concurrent rhythmic patterns" that sets in motion dancing or foot-tapping on the part of listeners."

As a verb:
groove (niceDefinition)
2. Dance or listen to popular or jazz music, esp. that with an insistent rhythm: they were grooving to Motown
3. Play such music in an accomplished and stylish manner: the rhythm section grooves in the true Basie manner

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