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How can I say this sentence more properly? Suppose I am with my girlfriend, and I say

"I want my whole life to be submerged in this particular moment".

I don't think that submerged is the right word. What I want to say is that I want my whole life to be in this particular moment that I am with my girlfriend. Can any one construct this sentence so that it sounds pleasant and correct?

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Hello jade, I suggest you to say that sentence with soft music in the background, but you should not be too sincere. –  user19148 Oct 7 '12 at 20:59
    
@Carlo_R. nice one man :) –  iJay Oct 7 '12 at 21:00
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I believe the more common phrasing is: I wish we could stay like this forever. –  Jim Oct 7 '12 at 22:56
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How about "I'd love to {capture/freeze/fossilize} this moment in amber and wear it on a chain around my neck"? –  user21497 Oct 7 '12 at 23:23
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@BillFranke She might take him up on it: Werd ich zum Augenblicke sagen: / Verweile doch! du bist so schön! / Dann magst du mich in Fesseln schlagen. –  StoneyB Oct 8 '12 at 4:34
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closed as too localized by FumbleFingers, Matt Эллен, Mr. Shiny and New 安宇, Mitch, MετάEd Oct 10 '12 at 17:48

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2 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Immersed is a possibility; immerse has sense “To involve deeply [eg] The sculptor immersed himself in anatomic studies”. “I want my whole life to be immersed in this moment.”

Also, quintessence (“A thing that is the most perfect example of its type; the most perfect embodiment of something; ... The essence in a thing that is its purest and most concentrated form”) may be relevant, as in “I want this moment to be the quintessence of my life”. Either of these examples (with immersed or quintessence) sound well enough, but whether they are sensible things to say is another issue. For one thing, it isn't clear what it means for a life to be immersed, or submerged, or quintessentially found, in a moment. For another, the subtext to “I want X to be Y” is “but it isn’t Y”. Perhaps drop the “I want” part.

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why do u think its not sensible to say so? –  iJay Oct 7 '12 at 21:01
    
@jade, see added sentences in answer. –  jwpat7 Oct 7 '12 at 21:15
    
u mean "This moment is the quintessence of my life" –  iJay Oct 7 '12 at 21:18
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The word you're looking for is subsumed.

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+1, 'subsumed' is a credible word, but 'immersed', suggested by jwpat7, has the right nuance in that romantic context. –  user19148 Oct 8 '12 at 8:19
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