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For example, I want to recommend a song of Adele to my friend. Should I say: The Someone Like You by Adele is fantastic. or The Someone Like You from Adele is fantastic. or The Someone Like You of Adele is fantastic. or something else.

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Hello Miles, both prepositions can be used but the meaning won't be the same. –  user19148 Oct 7 '12 at 18:21
    
Yes. Say something more. "Sung by Adele" ... "Written by Adele" ... "Videoed by Adele" ... "Named for Adele" ... "Inspired by Adele". –  GEdgar Oct 7 '12 at 19:15
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Well, you can knock one of them off the list. "The Someone Like You of Adele" just sounds horribly awkward to the ear. –  Souta Oct 7 '12 at 21:31
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@J.R. I wasn't speaking of those instances. I was speaking of the current one, and only of the current one. And that usage of of is different in comparison to OP's question. –  Souta Oct 8 '12 at 4:40
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@Souta: That's why I said you were right :^) And I agree that the usage is not the same, but it is similar. My point was to show how the "right" answer in these cases can shift with just a slight change in context. –  J.R. Oct 8 '12 at 9:06
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Someone Like You by Adele is fantastic.

Someone Like You from Adele is fantastic.

Someone Like You of Adele is fantastic.

I would say that the first is the standard usage and most correct.

The second is not wrong, but it sounds a bit colloquial to me.

The third is incorrect English. With people, you say "of Adele's" with a possessive 's. It means it's her song, rather than a song by her, if that makes sense.

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Regarding the last point, not probably, but most certainly. The is not part of the song's title, so "Adele's the" is plain ungrammatical, much like "My the car" or "My sister's the picture". Possessives and articles don't mix like that. –  RegDwigнt Oct 8 '12 at 10:23
    
@Gulliver Thank you. But what's the difference between "a song by her" and "her song"? I still don't get it. –  Miles Oct 8 '12 at 14:23
    
Hmm... interesting. As I see it: With "a song by her", the focus is on "a song", that happens to be a song by Adele. With "Adele's song", the focus is on Adele and her song. I would probably use "Adele's Someone Like You" at the beginning of a sentence, introducing a new topic, but "Someone Like You by Adele" towards the end of a sentence, when it's just clarifying which song by which artist. I think. Sorry, that's very vague and I'm sure someone else can give a better answer. –  Gulliver Oct 9 '12 at 8:32
    
Thank you. "I would probably use "Adele's Someone Like You" at the beginning of a sentence, introducing a new topic, but "Someone Like You by Adele" towards the end of a sentence, when it's just clarifying which song by which artist." I think I get it. –  Miles Oct 9 '12 at 16:24
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