Take the 2-minute tour ×
English Language & Usage Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for linguists, etymologists, and serious English language enthusiasts. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am writing a speech about people having people in their lives who are catalysts for them to propel them to something positive in their lives. These people enable others to be something better than they had been before.

Unfortunately, I cannot use the word "enabler" to describe those persons with one word, because the word "enabler" is defined as someone who enables drug abuse in someone else.

Does anyone know of a better word for enabler?

And, what gave the word "enabler" such a negative connotation in first place, especially since the verb generally is positive?

share|improve this question
    
Too Localised. I doubt many native speakers share OP's perception that enabler has specifically negative connotations. –  FumbleFingers Oct 3 '12 at 16:38
    
IMO, catalysts is already a great choice. –  coleopterist Oct 3 '12 at 16:38
    
@FumbleFingers I was unacquainted with it as well. However, that cesspool of slang that is Urban Dictionary has a relatively well received entry. –  coleopterist Oct 3 '12 at 16:40
    
@coleopterist: Citing Urban Dictionary implies it's a "slang" usage, but I suspect it's actually more used in "legal" contexts. –  FumbleFingers Oct 3 '12 at 17:12
    
@FumbleFingers You're right. WP offers both positive and negative connotations for the term. –  coleopterist Oct 3 '12 at 17:18
show 2 more comments

1 Answer

Mentor or Motivator would work as alternative terms. (I like catalyst too)

Enabler picked up its negative connotation from psychologists. In relation to behavioral psychology it refers to someone who assists a person with self-destructive behavior - not just drug use, but addictions or negative behavior patterns of any kind. (Making excuses, assisting in covering it up, obtaining materials, etc). It's not technically a specifically negative term but at least in the US it's almost never used outside of the context of enabling addictions or other negative life patterns.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.