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Can anyone tell me meaning of given sentence

Can anyone tell me exact meaning what this paragraph is trying to say?

Think of a product you would like to sell on the web. Imagine you sell only predefined packages of various quantities of components. Everything you sell is red in colour. You will only need three basic components. But you offer to sell them in four or more different combination packages.

I am not able to understand meaning of whole paragraph. In the first sentence, they mention one product, in the second line, they are selling predefined packages of various quantities of components. The fourth line is saying that I need three basic components. The last line is saying to sell them in different combination packages. So what is meaning of this?

I got confused trying to understand the meaning. Is it like taking one product, say a tennis ball, and selling them in different quantities like single, 2-ball pack, 5-ball pack? Or taking three different products and selling them in different combination?

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marked as duplicate by Roaring Fish, Kris, coleopterist, Cameron, MετάEd Oct 1 '12 at 14:10

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
Duplicate of a not-a-real-question. Voting to close. –  Kris Oct 1 '12 at 10:53

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted
  • Think of a product you would like to sell on the web. Let's say we want to sell tennis equipment, including tennis rackets (racquets), tennis shoes, tennis balls, etc.

  • Imagine you sell only predefined packages of various quantities of components. - You only sell packages. The buyers can not buy individual things that are in the package, only the whole package at once. For example, if you have a package with 2 balls, 2 shoes and a racket, the buyers will not be able to buy just the balls and the racket, they will have to buy everything.

  • Everything you sell is red in colour. This is rather straightforward.

  • You will only need three basic components. Remember, in our example we have rackets shoes and balls.

  • But you offer to sell them in four or more different combination packages. Your package may have:

    1. balls and shoes
    2. balls and rackets
    3. shoes and rackets
    4. balls shoes and rackets.
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A tennis rocket? The word you are looking for is 'racquet' or 'racket'. Sorry, but -1 for wrong word and answering an obviously duplicate question. –  Roaring Fish Oct 1 '12 at 10:42
    
@Roar, Ok, that was my bad about the rockets/rackets (that was a cruel example of not paying enough attention), but I would argue about your second point. Yes, this is a duplicate. But the original question was much worse than this one, and thus it was closed as not a real question. This particular question is better phrased and more clear. Yes, the OP should have edited the first question and voted to reopen, but he decided to post another question instead. So what is wrong in answering it, provided that the first question didn't get any answers at all? –  SingerOfTheFall Oct 1 '12 at 11:12
    
Thanks @SingerOfTheFall: I understood, and continue further... –  Hakoo Desai Oct 1 '12 at 11:24
    
The OP has taken the original question that was closed for not being a real question, added his comments to the original question, and posted it as a new question. You may think 'so what?', but he has ignored the advice given to him in the original question which should not be rewarded with an answer. A rephrased non-question is still a non-question. –  Roaring Fish Oct 1 '12 at 11:25
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Yes, this is the English Language and Usage forum and there is nothing wrong with the english language and usage in the paragraph you post. As there is no english language and usage problem to address, your problem understanding the paragraph is outside the scope of this English Language and Usage forum. This has already been explained to you. You could try asking the people who wrote the paragraph you post, or ELL, or a host of learner sites across the internet. –  Roaring Fish Oct 1 '12 at 12:33

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