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New York Times editorial today says:

The Bronx district attorney should be applauded for refusing to prosecute bad arrests that officers were unable to prove were warranted.

Should it be:

The Bronx district attorney should be applauded for refusing to prosecute bad arrests that officers were unable to prove where warranted.

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'Where' is a place - think of 'here' with a 'w' on the end. –  Roaring Fish Sep 27 '12 at 11:25
    
'where warranted' (or 'where X') is a phrase that can work in some circumstances, and almost works (but not really), but 'were' is correct here. It is very much a coincidence that the single letter change allows such a change in parsing (but coincidences happen all the time). To undo the ellipsis: "The officers were unable to prove that the bad arrests were warranted". –  Mitch Sep 27 '12 at 14:28
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closed as general reference by FumbleFingers, Andrew Leach, coleopterist, Robusto, RegDwigнt Sep 27 '12 at 11:57

This question is too basic; it can be definitively and permanently answered by a single link to a standard internet reference source designed specifically to find that type of information.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1 Answer

No. Were is the correct word, because there was no evidence the arrests were warranted.

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