Take the 2-minute tour ×
English Language & Usage Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for linguists, etymologists, and serious English language enthusiasts. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am trying to translate Veruca's Salt song "Seether" and I can't find this word's translation, or, at least, meaning.

Ow!
Seether is neither loose nor tight,
Seether is neither black nor white.
I tried to keep her on a short leash,
I tried to calm her down.
I tried to ram her into the ground, yeah.

Google Translator translates it in Russian as Огнечар, but I haven't found this word's meaning either.

It seems it is some kind of proper name; if so, from where?

share|improve this question
1  
I don't think this question is on topic. But to me, Seether is "one who seethes" –  Mr. Shiny and New 安宇 Sep 20 '12 at 18:06
1  
@Mr.ShinyandNew安宇 Why if it off topic? –  Barrie England Sep 20 '12 at 19:28
1  
@BarrieEngland Song interpretation and translation are off topic, IIRC. –  Mr. Shiny and New 安宇 Sep 20 '12 at 20:00
2  
@jwpat7: I asked, because I, too, could see nothing in the faq about song lyrics being off topic. If they are, perhaps there should be. I thought the OP raised a question of genuine English language interest. –  Barrie England Sep 20 '12 at 20:06
1  
I think it is a weird/poetic contraction for the purposes of maintaining meter and parallelism: "Seether is neither loose nor tight" = 'It is either, it is neither loose nor tight". –  Mitch Oct 18 '12 at 13:27
show 6 more comments

closed as off topic by Robusto, Mr. Shiny and New 安宇, J.R., coleopterist, tchrist Sep 20 '12 at 18:57

Questions on English Language & Usage Stack Exchange are expected to relate to English language and usage within the scope defined by the community. Consider editing the question or leaving comments for improvement if you believe the question can be reworded to fit within the scope. Read more about reopening questions here.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.