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I've been looking, but I have not come across this 'whom' related question anywhere. Specifically in this circumstance, I feel 'with whom' flows more naturally but I remember someone suggested that 'whom with' is actually the proper order since it is referencing 'the people'

I am looking to find a friendly environment where I can enjoy my work and the people whom with I work.

Or

I am looking to find a friendly environment where I can enjoy my work and the people with whom I work.

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5 Answers 5

You could always go with "I am looking to find a friendly environment where I can enjoy my work and the people I work with." :-)

However, "with whom" is clearly the correct form for your proposed wording. Whoever suggested "whom with" was smoking dope or something it like.

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Yah I'm glad I asked :) it does seem ridiculous. –  jtrip Jan 9 '11 at 1:46
    
I think the person who suggested "whom with" took inspirations from "wherewith," "wherefore," etc. –  jocap Mar 22 at 20:56

Your second example is correct. I don't believe I've ever seen "whom with".

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(BrE) Although prescriptivists will lament, in British standard spoken English, I would say neither of these is the norm. Nearly everyone will say:

I am looking to find a friendly environment where I can enjoy my work and the people I work with.

Actually looking to find also sounds pretty formal to me, and enjoying people has certain overtones, so they'd be more likely to say:

I am looking for a friendly environment where I can enjoy my work and the company of the people I work with.

Forget the old 'rule' about not ending a sentence with a preposition. Churchill killed that one, if it wasn't dead already. In the UK, whom is now used mostly only in written English, and only after a preposition, so - with whom

And this is what virtually all British-published English language courses for foreigners now teach.

You do occasionally hear someone use whom in spoken English, but they stick out like a sore thumb. Believe me, whom is on the way out.

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"with whom" is correct, because your dependent clause is "with whom I work", and prepositions (emphasis on pre) should in most cases introduce a prepositional phrase, except in some cases where it makes the statement seem awkward.

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Thanks! Excellent answer! I find avoiding ending my sentences with prepositions is a constant tricky battle. –  jtrip Jan 9 '11 at 1:58
2  
"Whom I work" is not a clause; you are missing the "with". [with whom] is the prepositional phrase, and the larger clause is [[with whom] I work]. –  Kosmonaut Jan 10 '11 at 16:14
    
Oops, you're right, thanks for pointing that out. I'll update my original answer. –  Ryan Jan 13 '11 at 2:39

The "whom with" suggestion might actually refer to the "whom...with" structure, like:

I am looking to find a friendly environment where I can enjoy my work and the people whom I work with

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protected by RegDwigнt Nov 11 '13 at 9:43

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