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What's the largest open-source dictionary that includes brief definitions of each word? Wiktionary is a great resource but:

  • There are over 200K words in the scowl list that aren't in wiktionary. I'd use scowl directly, but it only list words and has no definitions.

  • Wiktionary intentionally includes misspellings (sometimes not marked as such, and sometimes as redirection), and I'm looking for only correctly-spelled words.

  • Wiktionary's definitions are often lengthy, not brief.

  • It's difficult to automatically extract the portion of a wiktionary page that's the definition.

I'm somewhat surprised this question isn't in the FAQ, and that I couldn't find the answer by searching this site.

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Could you provide a link for this "scowl list"? I've not heard of it before. –  hippietrail May 5 '11 at 0:55
    
wordlist.sourceforge.net –  barrycarter May 5 '11 at 0:59
    
thanks (-: –  hippietrail May 5 '11 at 1:04
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3 Answers

The moreofit web site can be a good start to find sites similar to, here, wiktionary:

www.moreofit.com/similar-to/en.wiktionary.org/Top_10_Sites_Like_Wiktionary_En

The result includes dict.org, which can be of interest considering what you are after.

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You may be looking for WordNet, a lexical database for English developed by Princeton's Computer Science department. It has a permissive license allowing free use even in commercial applications. However, WordNet does not have “closed-class” words, including pronouns, prepositions, conjunctions, determiners, and particles.

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+1 WordNet is a wonderful tool. –  Noldorin Jan 18 '11 at 22:40
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I agree that WordNet is a pretty good source for definitions. I have started to build a multilingual dictionary (Deect) on top of WordNet's English words and definitions (actually included a few more things), and the users usually like the definitions from WordNet.

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I wonder why such awesome site is closed. –  PHPst Jan 27 at 4:43
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