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What is an expression or saying you could use to describe someone that is totally clueless of their surroundings?

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What surroundings? What's wrong with 'clueless'? –  Mitch Sep 14 '12 at 22:22
    
@Mitch, 'clueless' would be fine if I wanted to simply convey the meaning, but I'm not looking to merely convey the meaning--I want to colorfully paint out the meaning with a flair. –  Pamela Sep 14 '12 at 22:44
    
Oh, you didn't make that obvious. What suggestions from a thesaurus have you found? –  Mitch Sep 14 '12 at 23:17
    
If you're looking for "flair", then this question is much better suited for Writers.SE. –  Zairja Sep 15 '12 at 5:48
    
@Zairja, thanks! I had no idea about Writer's Stack Exchange! –  Pamela Sep 15 '12 at 18:37
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2 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Oblivious

not aware of or not noticing something, esp. what is happening around you: She was often oblivious to the potential consequences of her actions.

The slang term zoned out could also be used

Spaced out, stoned, unaware, oblivious, unconscious, drugged, narcotized. Derived from the 70's phrase "lost in the ozone", which led to the related terms "ozoned", "zoned", and "zoned out". I got kinda zoned out listening to Green Day and forgot to finish my term paper.

SUPPLEMENT: In light of the comment, what about:

in a daze

out to lunch

without a clue

in zombieland

head in the clouds

walking on air

playing without a full deck

spaced out

in lala land

spacey [no, that's just a term or synonym]

in his own world

It's not clear what you are looking for.

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Thanks, but do you know of any expressions or sayings rather than terms/synonyms? –  Pamela Sep 14 '12 at 22:41
    
Thanks! "Head in the clouds" is just the type I was looking for! –  Pamela Sep 15 '12 at 18:36
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"Away with the fairies."
"In a dwam." (Scottish)

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Nice. I've never heard of either one of those, but they both fit the bill. –  J.R. Sep 17 '12 at 8:36
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