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From Chapter 7, it was found that PV installers do not interact frequently with geographic data within their assessment, never mind 3D geographic data.

"Never mind" seems like a bit of a colloquialism. Do you have any suggestion for a better term or phrase to use?

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Thank you for the clarification, I blame the poor usage of "nevermind" to the prevalence of auto-correct and the American rock group Nirvana! –  Kel196 Aug 23 '12 at 15:34
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4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

As an alternative to never mind (which, by the way, I’ve never seen written as one word), you could use let alone:

In chapter 7, it was found that PV installers do not interact frequently with geographic data within their assessment, let alone with 3D geographic data.

Note the following additional suggestions:

  1. In rather than From. You could say: Recall, from chapter 7. But it was found in chapter 7 that such-and-such.
  2. A comma after assessment, to separate the subsequent phrase, which adds a further thought to the sentence.
  3. Repetition of with before 3D ... data. Otherwise, a reader unfamiliar with this topic (e.g., me) might (and indeed did) think that the missing preposition is the more nearby within, which then requires some mental back-pedalling.
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Hi there, thanks for your reply and excellent answer. Firstly, for picking up on my spelling of "nevermind". I've never noticed it probably due to the prevalence of auto-correct! Secondly, thanks for the additional suggestions, I have taken them on board! –  Kel196 Aug 23 '12 at 15:31
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I think "let alone" is almost as "colloquial" here as "never mind" - I'd probably use "even less with 3D data", since that's effectively the intended sense. –  FumbleFingers Aug 23 '12 at 15:34
    
@FumbleFingers. Interesting. For me there’s a clear register difference. I’m a UK/Aussie speaker. I see from your profile that you’re also in the UK. So, possibly a geographic difference, or a generational one? –  Daniel Harbour Aug 23 '12 at 16:08
    
@Daniel: You mean you don't think "let alone" used this way has overtones of colloquial informality? I assume from OP's passive "it was found" that the context is formal/academic/etc. - well and truly not the same register as never mind or let alone, in my understanding. Jay's alternatives (not the first!) are all better suited, imho. –  FumbleFingers Aug 23 '12 at 16:27
    
@FumbleFingers: That’s right: it wouldn’t jar for me in an academic publication. Let me see if I can ferret some out. –  Daniel Harbour Aug 23 '12 at 19:15
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"Not to mention ..." "Even if we do not consider ..." "This is even more true for ..." "And especially ..."

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Besides previously-mentioned phrases never mind, let alone, and even less, consider still less. (For example, replace “never mind 3D geographic data” by “and still less so with 3D geographic data”.) Phrase not to mention might also be used here by some writers, but is ambiguous in this context.

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"Far less" adds another varnish of pomposity. –  StoneyB Aug 23 '12 at 18:38
    
@StoneyB, you may be right, and "far less" is not a suggestion I'd make here. I think let alone is a good choice, possibly the best choice; but "still less so" seems the clearest and least ambiguous wording. –  jwpat7 Aug 23 '12 at 18:47
    
I only suggested it because OP seems to be looking for something academic. –  StoneyB Aug 23 '12 at 20:00
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I personally would go with something like:

0) In chapter 7, it was found that PV installers interact rarely with geographic data within their assessment and even less often with 3D geographic data.

Or possibly:

1) In chapter 7, it was found that PV installers do not interact frequently with geographic data within their assessment nor obviously with 3D geographic data.

But maybe it is more common in math to say that things are obvious. Maybe if you want to test your readers' Latin:

2) In chapter 7, it was found that PV installers do not interact frequently with geographic data within their assessment nor, a fortiori, with 3D geographic data.

(I actually kind of like this one.) I think, if you are trying to be careful and precise, it isn't exactly clear how some fact can be truer than another. I also think there is some structural confusion from negating interact, but if you really want the original kind of structure:

3) In chapter 7, it was found that PV installers do not interact frequently with geographic data within their assessment and even less so with 3D geographic data.

But I think it would be better as:

4) In chapter 7, it was found that PV installers interact infrequently with geographic data within their assessment and even less with 3D geographic data.

P.S. I always say and write nevermind as a single word.

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+ for a fortiori –  StoneyB Aug 23 '12 at 18:38
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