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Is there a better phrase or word to use than lengthy date? For example:

We give this lengthy date to accommodate the dispute respecting the Hermas who is the author of the Pastor.

This seems a bit archaic to me. Is there a better word, phrase or anything else to express the above thought?

Note, Hermas was “a man in Rome to whom Paul sent greetings”, second century, possibly “the author of the celebrated religious romance called The Shepherd” or The Pastor.

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closed as not a real question by MετάEd, Matt Эллен, Mahnax, tchrist, FumbleFingers Aug 31 '12 at 2:24

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This sentence makes no sense to me after "dispute". Is the dispute about who is the author? Is the Pastor a story or a person? –  Rachel Aug 22 '12 at 12:07
    
@Rachel: jwpat7 put the reference to the book. –  Noah Aug 22 '12 at 17:08

3 Answers 3

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It's not entirely clear without more context, but I presume lengthy date here means a date at a relatively far point in the future.

Instead of the given term you could use the following:

We give this distant future date to accommodate the dispute respecting the Hermas who is the author of the Pastor.

We give this long lead time to accommodate the dispute respecting the Hermas who is the author of the Pastor.

We give this much time in advance to accommodate the dispute respecting the Hermas who is the author of the Pastor.

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Examining what I take to be your source, Peters' Theocratic Kingdom, it appears that the author is explaining why he suggests an unusually long period of time, "from A.D. 40 to 150", as the timeframe within which the Pastor of Hermas might have been written.

It's an awkward construction. If I had been around in 1884 I might have written something like "We give this very long range of possible dates to accommodate differing opinions respecting the identity of Hermas the author of the Pastor with the Hermas mentioned in Rom. 16:14."

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Assuming that this is the intended meaning, I second the thoughts here. I would say something like "we give this [long/extended/wide/broad] [period/range (of dates)]". –  Rachel Aug 22 '12 at 19:19

In courts, lawyers will often ask for a long date or a short date. This refers to how quickly the next hearing/trial will occur. Complex cases where bail has been granted usually try for a long date in order to adequately prepare a case. Simple cases where bail has not been granted will ask for a short date, to get it over with quickly.

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Can I say: after the interview they usually give you a short date to hire you, to mean that they don't delay the hiring after the interview? Or long date to mean otherwise? –  Noah Aug 22 '12 at 17:06

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