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What is the meaning of “every other time”?

What does the phrase every other day/week mean? I got some hint from here. But, it is still not clear to me what is the need to add other.

Can we also say every alternative day/week?

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marked as duplicate by Mitch, Matt Эллен, jwpat7, tchrist, Mahnax Aug 31 '12 at 2:22

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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Every day means: day1, day2, day3, day4, day5, etc., i.e. every single day, not skipping any.

Every other day means: day1, day3, day5, day7, etc., i.e. skipping every second day - one day on, one day off, and so on.

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What about the answer in the link in my question (I corrected it)? –  Stat-R Aug 21 '12 at 11:54
    
@Stat-R: What about it? It basically says the same thing, a bit less explicitly –  Armen Ծիրունյան Aug 21 '12 at 11:56
    
Oh.Ya..I did not understand it properly. Actually, I had the notion that it would be one day on and one day off. But wanted clarifation. Thanks for making it explicit. –  Stat-R Aug 21 '12 at 12:25
    
Technicality: In context, the phrase might also mean every day other than some specified day, like "On Fridays I eat fish; every other day I eat meat." –  Jay Aug 21 '12 at 16:39
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The word other, in this case, is used to mean alternate. It is similar to saying "every odd week" or "every even week", only it doesn't matter what number week it is, it only matters that it's every second one.

Saying "every week" and saying "every other week" are not equivalent; it has nothing to do with rules of grammar, only with the fact that it's every second week.

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