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Example:

Since x is even (i.e., divisible by 2), its --word-- is true.
Since y is odd, y's --word-- is false.

The description suggests 'moddity', but there was another word for it...

BTW, I don't know if I should've asked this on Math on SE, so sorry if this violates this site's FAQ (my first question here).

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closed as too localized by Jasper Loy, kiamlaluno, Mark Beadles, MετάEd, tchrist Aug 26 '12 at 15:21

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I don't understand the question. Do you mean only divisible by 2? The title doesn't say this. –  Urbycoz Aug 20 '12 at 9:59
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The property of being divisible by X is called divisibility by X. –  RegDwigнt Aug 20 '12 at 10:06
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@RegDwightАΑA No, there was another "boolean" word, i.e., it could be true or false –  YatharthROCK Aug 20 '12 at 10:09
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Divisibility by X is boolean. It is or isn't divisible by X –  Matt Эллен Aug 20 '12 at 10:13
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@YatharthROCK: There's a question here that talks about that... –  J.R. Aug 20 '12 at 10:53

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

While I don't believe that it's an exact fit, you can consider the word, parity:

In mathematics, the parity of an object states whether it is even or odd.

Wiktionary also provides an example:

(mathematics, countable) A set with the property of having all of its elements belonging to one of two disjoint subsets, especially a set of integers split in subsets of even and odd elements.

Parity is always preserved in such operations.

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<astonishment> Why, yes, I was thinking of parity! –  YatharthROCK Aug 20 '12 at 14:11
    
Thanks, it feels good to finally be able to scratch that itch (was that correct usage BTW?) :) –  YatharthROCK Aug 20 '12 at 14:12
    
@YatharthROCK You're welcome and yes, your usage is fine. –  coleopterist Aug 20 '12 at 14:57
    
@JasperLoy Well, my memory was quite fuzzy... –  YatharthROCK Aug 20 '12 at 15:19
    

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