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Can I use in which year in the middle of a sentence?

The industry has being growing at a record-breaking scale, excepting only 2008, in which year, financial crisis stroke most sectors of the world’s economy.

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When, plain and simple. Also, speed, not scale; except, not excepting; the crisis, not crisis; struck, not stroke. –  RegDwigнt Aug 16 '12 at 18:23
    
And has been, not has being –  JAM Aug 16 '12 at 18:25
    
And no comma after year/when –  StoneyB Aug 20 '12 at 17:28
    
@Reg: excepting, though a bit archaic, is not impossible in OP's context. –  Noah Aug 20 '12 at 17:35

3 Answers 3

Of course you can use in which year in the middle of a sentence (I can’t imagine where else you could use it), but I would make some other alterations:

The industry has being growing at a record-breaking rate [not scale], excepting only 2008, in which year, the financial crisis struck [not stroke] most sectors of the world’s economy [or world economy].

I’m not crazy about excepting in 2008 for a reason I can’t put my finger on. How about:

The industry has grown at record-breaking rate in all recent years except 2008, when the financial crisis struck most sectors of the world economy.

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Others have pointed out the other errors in the passage, but yes, it (the "in which year" part) is correct and there are some examples at ngrams...though it does seem to be falling off in popularity...that is hard to say, though, since it includes usage at the start of the sentence, too.

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I didn't downvote your answer, but am tempted to do so because the vagueness of "it is perfectly correct" allows the erroneous impression that the whole sentence is ok. The sentence has some problems and is not ok. –  jwpat7 Aug 16 '12 at 19:07
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Hey, at least I caught the "wich" in the title! I will edit, though. –  JeffSahol Aug 16 '12 at 19:29

The industry has being growing at a record-breaking scale, excepting only 2008, in which year, financial crisis stroke most sectors of the world’s economy.

It would be grammatically correct to use "in which year" in the middle of a sentence, but does not "sound" as good or read as fluently as other options. Also, there are other parts of the sentence which must be changed before it can become fully correct.

  • "Has been growing" is more passive and less powerful than "has grown".

  • "Excepting only 2008" sounds awkward, and should be switched with something like "with the exception of 2008".

  • ", in which year," while correct, should be changed to "during which" (which allows the sentence to continue more smoothly) and should not end with a comma.

  • "Stroke" is not the correct past-tense conjugation of "to strike" and should be changed to "struck".

Finally, as more of a stylistic choice than anything, the end of the sentence might sound more formal if "the global economy" were used instead of "the world's economy".

So, here is the corrected sentence:

The industry has grown at a record-breaking scale, with the exception of 2008, during which financial crisis struck most sectors of the global economy.

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Word scale doesn't work. Also, your final sentence says "with the exception of 2008". What is 2008 an exception to? 2008 is a year, and years aren't mentioned elsewhere in the sentence. Consider instead "The industry has grown at a record-breaking rate, except when financial crisis struck many sectors of the global economy in 2008." –  jwpat7 Aug 17 '12 at 5:47

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