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Is there a word for the succeeding day after the last day of a period?

Let’s say I had to do a homework assignment and I had to submit it before a specific date. One that due date passes, I may be subject to penalties according to the number of days late.

Here is another example. Suppose I had to pay a bill until a specific date. I'm running late by one day. I can still pay, but I have to pay interest too, according to the number of days in late.

If it was one day late, is there a word for that?

What if it were two days late? Is there a word for the second of the two, or for both these days together?

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The word for all those things is either late or overdue. If you are a minute or a day or a month past a deadline, you are late. –  Robusto Aug 11 '12 at 15:50
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I'm wondering if there's an antonym of eve that fits the description "day after". –  American Luke Aug 11 '12 at 15:51
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The word is morrow, it's no longer used, and I'm not sure it was ever used in association with due dates. –  Peter Shor Aug 11 '12 at 16:01
    
@PeterShor What jape is this that would consign the morrow to olden tomes of yesteryear? –  tchrist Aug 11 '12 at 18:28
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'tis but an old man's fancy for it doth still fall upon mine ears even on this good day. –  Jim Aug 11 '12 at 18:37
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3 Answers 3

Another option is to refer to the payment directly and to the number of days indirectly allowing you to use the term:

in arrears: the state of being behind in the discharge of obligations < in arrears with the rent >

You may then say things like:

My payment is two days in arrears.

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+1 Is it just me or is the singular arrear rarely used nowadays? Even Chrome's spell-checker is complaining about it ... –  coleopterist Aug 11 '12 at 18:44
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As suggested by Robusto, the most common term would be one day late or one day overdue. Subsequent delay would be two days late/overdue and so forth.

The term past due could also be used, as in one day past due. Post due might also be used, but I think this would be less common and a bit formal.

I do not know of a single word, other than morrow (and its limitations) as discussed in comments.

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While not specific to days, there are a couple of terms that are related to the period after a deadline. They are:

  • Grace period: (idiomatic) A length of time during which rules or penalties do not take effect or are withheld.

    “The fees begin to accrue after a one-month grace period.”

  • Redemption period (Wikipedia link is just an example): But a redemption period usually begins once a deadline has passed (and often after a “grace period”), and redeeming the situation often involves the payment of penalties of some sort.

These terms are involved in everything from banking and taxation to domain registration.

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