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Could anyone give me some examples or rules of using ", of which"? I mean only ", of which", neither "which" nor ", xxx of which". Any idea is appreciated.

p.s. She discovered so many spiders, of which she was most afraid. - Cool Elf

Is it possible, that "of" is not an essential part of the verb in the relative clause? If not, I think I should accept the answer from Cool Elf.

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closed as not constructive by Matt Эллен, J.R., Carlo_R., jwpat7, cornbread ninja 麵包忍者 Aug 2 '12 at 15:24

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Welcome, macio.Jun. I'm afraid questions where each answer is equally valid are considered not constructive. Perhaps you could edit your question to require a concrete answer. Please read the faq for more information. –  Matt Эллен Aug 2 '12 at 11:21
    
Welcome to ELU, macio; you might be interested in reading this question: english.stackexchange.com/questions/73922/… –  user19148 Aug 2 '12 at 11:29
    
Thank you Matt, but I can't really find one meaningful usage for ", of which". Thank you Carlo_R, that thread only discusses the usage of ", xxx of which". –  macio.Jun Aug 2 '12 at 11:37

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

"Of which" is part of a relative clause.

"Which" is the relative pronoun and "of" is a preposition placed at the beginning of the relative clause, instead of at the end.

A few examples of this construction are:

  1. She discovered so many spiders, of which she was most afraid.

  2. He answered all the listening and reading excercises, of which the test mostly consisted.

  3. The team won a silver medal, of which they were very proud.

Note also that you can place "of" differently:

  1. She discovered so many spiders, which she was most afraid of.

  2. He answered all the listening and reading exercises, which the test mostly consisted of.

  3. The team won a silver medal, which they were very proud of.

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Cool Elf, Thank you for your concrete explanation. But I am sure that I've seen some other cases, under which "of" is not an essential part of the verb in the conditoin sentence. –  macio.Jun Aug 2 '12 at 13:35
    
the of which construction is often used to avoid ending a sentence with a preposition. This long standing rule seems to be fading. –  bib Aug 2 '12 at 13:42
    
Hi macio.Jun. How about "There were three books, of which the blue one was the thickest"? –  Cool Elf Aug 2 '12 at 14:43
    
This is equivalent to "There were three books, the blue one of which was the thickest". –  macio.Jun Aug 2 '12 at 15:11
    
@macio.Jun "There were three books, and the blue one of which was the thickest." –  xando May 30 '13 at 20:52

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