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What are the differences in meaning between the below two sentences:

  1. He was just offered a well-paid job with Radio Four. (Past Simple Passive)
  2. He has just been offered a well-paid job with Radio Four. (Present Perfect Passive)

Both are grammatically correct, but what are the real meaning if I use #1 / #2?

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@PartTimer Please read through this FAQ. The questions that you have asked before should be listed on your profile page ... –  coleopterist Aug 2 '12 at 9:01
    
Is this American English or British English? –  Andrew Leach Aug 2 '12 at 9:26
    
This is British English. Is this the reason why both sentences have different meaning to each other? –  Part Timer Aug 2 '12 at 9:39

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Both are grammatically correct, but (1) is not idiomatic usage in British English.

  1. He was just offered a well-paid job with Radio Four.
  2. He has just been offered a well-paid job with Radio Four.

British English speakers might use the active form:

  1. I have just offered him a well-paid job with Radio Four.
  2. (colloq.) I just offered him that job!

I believe the reason is that He was offered connotes an event some time in the past, and contradicting that with just sounds odd. It's understood though, probably because it is used thus in American English (I believe).

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Might not he was just offered mean he was only offered? –  TimLymington Aug 2 '12 at 13:56
    
@Tim Yes, but in the context of the question which matches (1) and (2) as broadly equivalent, it doesn't :-) –  Andrew Leach Aug 2 '12 at 14:00

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