Take the 2-minute tour ×
English Language & Usage Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for linguists, etymologists, and serious English language enthusiasts. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want to mention on my CV that I also know a little bit about Java and C#. What is a better way to mention that? I think one of the following may be correct:

1) Also have some knowledge on Java and C#.

2) Also have some knowledge of Java and C#.

Which one is correct? How can I mention it on my CV?

share|improve this question

closed as off topic by RegDwigнt Aug 1 '12 at 8:45

Questions on English Language & Usage Stack Exchange are expected to relate to English language and usage within the scope defined by the community. Consider editing the question or leaving comments for improvement if you believe the question can be reworded to fit within the scope. Read more about reopening questions here.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

3  
Knowledge of, experience in –  asymptotically Aug 1 '12 at 3:30
    
In its current form, the question is not a good fit for this site. You might wish to support our proposed sister site for English language learners. Thank you. –  RegDwigнt Aug 1 '12 at 8:44
    
@RedDwighт: Questions on the following topics are welcomed here: Word choice and usage. I believe the above is the case. Btw, it is not unusual for a StackExchange question to belong to more than one site, e.g. unix.*, serverfault and askubuntu. So I think you have been a bit too over-restrictive here. –  ジョージ Feb 21 '13 at 10:03

2 Answers 2

"Knowledge on" is not a commonly used form, but "knowledge of" is both common and correct. If you look at this Google nGram chart comparing the two, you will see that "knowledge on" is virtually never used. Personally, as a native English speaker, I have never used "knowledge on" but often use "knowledge of."

share|improve this answer

In the examples, knowledge of is proper, and knowledge on is not. However, neither form is good for use in a CV: "some knowledge" is an indeterminate skill level that could range from "have heard of" to "super good programmer in". It probably is better to be more specific, and indicate items like the following: how many programs you've written in each; how large the programs were; how many weeks or decades you studied the language; whether your knowledge is based on a formal course, self study, contest-site competitions; whether you can knowledgeably read and comment on others' programs in the language.

share|improve this answer

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.