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I'm confused about the use of "at" or "to" in the following sentence:

This function puts the number at/to right of the equal into a new set

I see a lot of people using "at" but I am pretty sure that it's wrong! Which is correct?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

At is used when the position is absolute; to is used when the position is relative.

Since, the context is about a position with respect to 'equal' thing, to is used predominantly.

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I'm not sure about American English, but in British English I would expect "to" and not "at". For example, you might see: -

This function puts the number to the right of the equal into a new set

This function puts the number on the right-hand-side into a new set

This function puts the number on the right into a new set

This function puts the right-hand number into a new set

So, quite a few options, but none of them use "at". In truth, I think you are more likely to encounter "on" than "to", and "to" is more likely than "at".

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I would expect "to" in American English, as well. –  Peter Shor Jul 25 '12 at 13:06
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