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What is the unit for a blueberry? how do you count each blueberries?

ex) 3 pieces of cake
2 slices of pizza
5 ?? of blueberry

Edit: Do the following sentences sound natural?

Blueberries are so expensive in Korea. They cost almost 1$ for 10 pieces.

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closed as general reference by Andrew Leach, Matt Эллен, RegDwigнt Jul 24 '12 at 12:24

This question is too basic; it can be definitively and permanently answered by a single link to a standard internet reference source designed specifically to find that type of information.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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Exactly the same way as cakes and pizzas: 2 slices of blueberry; five blueberries. –  Andrew Leach Jul 24 '12 at 12:11
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Nobody slices up blueberries. And you are not counting slices anyway. You are counting berries. Luckily, berries are countable. I.e. berries are counted in berries. Five blueberries. $1 for 10 berries. –  RegDwigнt Jul 24 '12 at 12:24
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Nominated for reopening. The question boils down to "is berry a mass noun or a count noun", but this in not something which is given in most dictionaries. –  JSBձոգչ Jul 24 '12 at 13:12
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@Daniel Chinese has measure words for nearly everything (and maybe Japanese and Korean). English has very few measure words. We mostly just use units when something is divided up - slices, pieces, parts - when there's a natural grouping - pairs, sets, decks, packs - or when the original word is not countable - dollars, kilograms, liters. –  Charles Jul 24 '12 at 13:55
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A more natural sentence:"Blueberries are so expensive in Korea. 10 of them cost almost $1." Note that when writing out prices, the dollar sign comes first. –  KnightOfNi May 17 at 21:20

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