Take the 2-minute tour ×
English Language & Usage Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for linguists, etymologists, and serious English language enthusiasts. It's 100% free, no registration required.

i want to get a professional photographer to take my photo. which question is grammatically correct?

  1. do you know where I can get a professional photographer take my photo?
  2. do you know where I can have a professional photographer to take my photo?

I saw the difference is only "get" and "have" part. and also "to" in sentence 2. please tell me the true answer.. thank you

share|improve this question

closed as off topic by Jasper Loy, Matt Эллен, Mahnax, cornbread ninja 麵包忍者, kiamlaluno Jul 11 '12 at 22:02

Questions on English Language & Usage Stack Exchange are expected to relate to English language and usage within the scope defined by the community. Consider editing the question or leaving comments for improvement if you believe the question can be reworded to fit within the scope. Read more about reopening questions here.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

2 Answers 2

The best answer is actually:

Do you know where I can get a professional photographer to take my photo?

You want to use "get" with "to."

share|improve this answer

The title of your post should be "more correct" and not "most correct," because you're choosing between only two.

"Get" and "have" are Causative Verbs and both of them can be used to express what you want. But here are their respective patterns:

get + somebody + to Verb

have + somebody + Base Verb

Because of this, both your sentences are wrong.


You can also avoid Causative Verbs altogether:

Do you know where I can find a professional photographer to take my photo?

In this particular example, you don't need to care about the Infinitive (to + Verb) anymore because it's not connected to any Causative Verb.

share|improve this answer
    
I really don't see what's wrong with 'Do you know where I can get...' 'Get' simply means 'obtain' here. –  Barry Brown Jul 10 '12 at 15:10
    
Hi. The issue isn't so much the Verb. I have nothing against it. It's the absence of a word to connect the phrase "take my photo" in the OP's Example # 1. See above –  Cool Elf Jul 10 '12 at 15:19

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.