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I have two books, of which one is borrowed.

Is this correct? Is there such a phrase?

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1 Answer

Yes, it's grammatically correct, although it would be more usual to say "I have two books, one of which is borrowed".

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Thanks @Christi , I agree "one of which" does sound more usual. I think that is why I doubted of which was correct in my construction. –  watkib Jul 9 '12 at 10:17
    
I would use 'of which one...' only if I were then going on to say something about the other(s). Example: I have two books, of which one is mine and one is borrowed. –  Karl Jul 9 '12 at 10:29
    
"one of which is mine" would also work in that context. "The bank across the street, of which I am the manager, is up for sale" could not be rephrased in the same way, but I must confess I am at a loss as to the rule which means only the inverted form is appropriate in this final case. –  Christi Jul 9 '12 at 10:36
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It's grammatical, but unlikely in authentic speech. What you would probably hear would be something like 'Yeh, I've got these two books, see? They're not both mine though. I borrowed one from a mate.' –  Barrie England Jul 9 '12 at 10:44
    
@Christi: the difference is that one is the subject of the relative clause, but the manager isn't . The bank across the street, the manager of which is a friend of mine, ... is grammatical, if stilted. –  Colin Fine Jul 9 '12 at 14:01
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