Take the 2-minute tour ×
English Language & Usage Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for linguists, etymologists, and serious English language enthusiasts. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Possible Duplicate:
Which one is more correct: “works at a university” or “works in a university”?
“In college” versus “at college” versus “at university”

He teaches at xxx University. He teaches in xxx University. What's the difference between at and in here?

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by cornbread ninja 麵包忍者, FumbleFingers, MετάEd, Mark Beadles, jwpat7 Jul 6 '12 at 6:04

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
I would use "at" at all because "in" has a tridimensional connotation that in your case seems awkard to my ear. –  user19148 Jul 5 '12 at 23:51
    
What is the use of linking as a possible duplicate a question that has been closed? –  MετάEd Jul 6 '12 at 0:17
    
@MetaEd woops; didn't go deep enough. –  cornbread ninja 麵包忍者 Jul 6 '12 at 0:39

1 Answer 1

The sentence "he teaches at xxx University" implies that the individual in question is part of the university faculty. The sentence "he teaches in xxx University" is unidiomatic, but might mean "he teaches on the university grounds, but not officially, or not as part of the university faculty (perhaps he teaches at a daycare on the university campus).

share|improve this answer
    
I am from the US, and agree that "teaches at xxx University" is the way to say it here. (James seems to be from Canada.) But someone in UK, India, Australia, etc., should tell us the way to say it there... –  GEdgar Jul 6 '12 at 0:34
1  
Yes, school, university or college is a place, so it gets at. The Department, however, is a container, so it gets in. She teaches Galois Theory in the Mathematics Department at/of Southern North Dakota State University. –  John Lawler Jul 6 '12 at 1:28
    
@John- I don't think a department is a container in today's schools. In your example that would be the correct way to say it, but if I wanted to say something about the department without putting it in another place, I would use at, assuming the department has more than one buildings? – Noah 6 mins ago –  Noah Jul 6 '12 at 3:09
    
I just meant that metaphorically. Faculty teach in a department but at a school. –  John Lawler Jul 6 '12 at 4:44

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.