Take the 2-minute tour ×
English Language & Usage Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for linguists, etymologists, and serious English language enthusiasts. It's 100% free, no registration required.

What would it mean for writing to be "crenelated"? From this review:

Lisa Zeidner of The New York Times Book Review elaborated:

As usual, Gibson's prose is ... corpuscular, crenelated.

I thought crenelated just meant having ridges / being like the top of a castle wall.

share|improve this question
4  
Was "this review" meant to be a link? More context is certainly in order. "As usual, Gibson's prose is — to use some of his favorite adjectives — corpuscular, crenelated. His sentences slide from silk to steel, and take tonal joy rides from the ironic to the earnest. But he never gets lost in the language, as he sometimes has in the past." Edit: I actually think that's pretty much self-explanatory. –  RegDwigнt Dec 22 '10 at 23:53
    
ah yes my friend did not include the following sentence, which does explain it all! –  Claudiu Dec 22 '10 at 23:59

1 Answer 1

up vote 7 down vote accepted

I think Ms. Zeidner meant that his language is full of contrasts, changing at sharp angles. At least that is how I interpret this: apparently the metaphor is Ms. Zeidner's own invention. Note that she purposefully uses some favourite words of Gibson's, as you can read in this version of the review: "As usual, Gibson's prose is -- to use some of his favorite adjectives -- corpuscular, crenelated. His sentences slide from silk to steel, and take tonal joy rides from the ironic to the earnest." http://www.themodernword.com/pynchon/gibson_review.html

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.