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This has come to my mind,

person doing test is a tester, person doing development is a developer, person doing consultation is a consultant, etc. My question, as written on the title, is, what's a person doing an assurance? If you need it more specific, what's a person doing a software quality assurance.

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You mean like someone who does QA? –  simchona Jun 26 '12 at 0:00
    
exactly... I forgot to add the 'quality' word –  zfm Jun 26 '12 at 0:02
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assurer is acceptable by M-W standards. –  cornbread ninja 麵包忍者 Jun 26 '12 at 0:16

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Someone who does Software Quality Assurance (SQA) would likely be called a software quality analyst:

A Software Quality Analyst is responsible for applying the principles and practices of software quality assurance throughout the software development life cycle. The role of a software quality analyst is often confused with the software testing role. Most software companies designate software testing as software quality assurance, whereas these roles are different. Software Testing is product oriented, Software Quality Assurance is process oriented.

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sadly, I'm one of the people thinking that doing testing means doing assurance as well... –  zfm Jun 26 '12 at 0:07
    
@zfm I don't think there's a "right" answer about testing vs. assurance. It probably depends on the organization. –  simchona Jun 26 '12 at 0:09
    
is software quality analyst same as software analyst? –  zfm Jun 26 '12 at 3:33
    
@zfm I don't think so, but I'm not an expert on job titles. –  simchona Jun 26 '12 at 3:39
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@zfm Not normally. A software quality analyst would look at software which had already been written, analysing its quality; a software analyst [I'm one] analyses the requirement in order to write it in the first place. –  Andrew Leach Jun 26 '12 at 8:51

protected by RegDwigнt Mar 24 '13 at 12:13

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