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Feminism is defined as

Feminism is a collection of movements aimed at defining, establishing, and defending equal political, economic, and social rights for women.

in Wikipedia and

A social theory or political movement supporting the equality of both sexes in all aspects of public and private life; specifically, a theory or movement that argues that legal and social restrictions on females must be removed in order to bring about such equality.

in Wiktionary. Masculism is defined as the exact same but with equality for men's rights, which actually means the same.

I think that this is in fact a wrong use of the word feminism which puts emphasis on the word women (~ Latin femina) instead of equality between sexes.

I'm looking for a word that represents a movement which can be assumed and extremist feminism and that supports more or better rights for women above men. Or just supporting more women's rights regardless of those of men. This is what I would think of when hearing feminism, until I discovered this wasn't true.

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I don't think you can define feminism quite so easily. To my mind this is more of a politics question. I'm sure you can find terms like ultra-feminism and so on, though they are most likely going to be considered pejorative by feminists. –  z7sg Ѫ Jun 23 '12 at 12:00
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I'm curious why you're looking for such a term. –  Russell Borogove Jun 23 '12 at 19:43
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The terms Feminism and Masculism cannot be defined as simple antonyms. Feminism has a long history fighting against male domination and for equality. Masculism in contrast does not fight against female domination as in most societies there was and is no female domination. –  Jakob Jun 23 '12 at 19:48
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@Jakob I'm aware of the fact that feminism is more than it's meaning. But nevertheless is it commonly defined the way I cited. Which is a very well description of the movement it originated from. Sadly only, pure etymologically, I think the word is not very suited for it's meaning. And in these modern times there are people using if for a more extreme way of thinking than the original meaning. But I think the word feminism is more suited for this this meaning than for it's original one. Etymologically. –  Steven Roose Jun 23 '12 at 20:06

3 Answers 3

up vote 11 down vote accepted

A derisive term used by people to denigrate a person whose feminism is felt to be too extreme is feminazi.

Female domination or female superiority refers to the theory or state of women having authority over men.

Matriarchy refers to a social structure in which women dominate families and familial rights pass from mothers to daughters.

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This answer is even worse; "feminazi" is a derailing and dismissive term most often applied to women of an incredibly moderate feminism in an attempt to seek a false "middle ground" in a space that retains male superiority. (And "female domination" mostly commonly describes a type of BDSM scenario.) –  user2400 Jun 23 '12 at 18:16
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@JoeWreschnig I think I was looking for a term like feminazi. I was looking for women that demand all men's rights for women but without sacrificing any women's benefits. F.e. women claiming that a minimum of 50% women is required in a government, but 60% is no problem either. Or those thinking it's wrong that most domestic workers are women but having no problem with garbage collectors being all men. –  Steven Roose Jun 23 '12 at 19:04
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'Feminazi' might be exactly what you're looking for but it is considered somewhat derogatory and is often used as an insult to proponents of regular mainstream feminism. Why doesn't 'extreme feminism' work? (since it should capture the extreme elements that you're thinking of) –  Mitch Jun 23 '12 at 20:03
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You were not looking for such women but for a term that is used to describe them. The term feminazi is only used as offense, not as description, as nobody would give himself this name. –  Jakob Jun 23 '12 at 20:29
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@Steven: Bringing a term like "feminazi" into a serious discussion of modern gender issues is like trying to bring a term like "carpetbagger" into a serious discussion of modern race issues. You will be instantly (and rightly) written off as a crazy bigot. (Also: "I was looking for women that demand all men's rights for women but without sacrificing any women's benefits. F.e. women claiming that a minimum of 50% women is required in a government, but 60% is no problem either." The latter is not an example of the former.) –  user2400 Jun 23 '12 at 21:45

I'd suggest female chauvinism.

Female chauvinism refers to the attitude that women are superior to men, and it has been used by critics of some aspects of feminism. This should be kept distinct from a similar but not identical concept of the term popularized by "Female Chauvinist Pigs: Women and the Rise of Raunch Culture" a book by Ariel Levy published in 2005.

More discussion is available in the Wikipedia article about female chauvinism and chauvinism in general.

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This is the best answer. It cites real sources, by women, who identify as feminists and identified by others as feminists. While there is still contention around both the term and its semantics it is a legitimate "term of art". –  user2400 Jun 23 '12 at 18:18

If you would like to be instantly identifiable as a privileged male geek, I recommend turbofeminist. It is a recent coinage, but will instantly create the kind of strawman you want in the minds of others such as yourself, and likewise let decent people write you off just as quickly.

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Turbofeminism produces 229 hits in Google and I can't find somewhat of a definition anywhere. –  Steven Roose Jun 23 '12 at 22:05
    
229 hits in its three day existence is pretty good I think. –  user2400 Jun 23 '12 at 22:08
    
I can find mentions from <Jun 13th. Even some from 2010, but probably they refer to "becoming a feminist quickly". Still didn't find any definitions. –  Steven Roose Jun 23 '12 at 22:14
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I like the tone of this answer, but not the actual suggestion, as I've never heard of it before. –  TRiG Jun 23 '12 at 22:20
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@TRiG: It was used by a Kotaku commenter a few days ago while describing his outrage at the site giving the meagre scraps it does to gender equality (i.e. the same crap Steven is doing here). Some feminist game developers / critics on Twitter have taken it and run with it. –  user2400 Jun 23 '12 at 22:23

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