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Which one is correct?

and why?

I think "worth it" is an adjective phrase. So what is "worth" then?

Sample,

You should try spending money on her. It worths it.

You should try spending money on her. It worth it.

You should try spending money on her. It is worth it.

Which one is right? The last 2 is not condemned by grammar checker.

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Please give us some more context. How is the phrase being used (in a complete sentence)? I believe worths is a word only in the fact that it's the plural of the noun worth. –  JLG Jun 2 '12 at 14:16
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4 Answers

up vote 24 down vote accepted

Worth as a verb is obsolete. Where have you seen or heard It worths it or It worth it?

What you will find is It’s worth it, used to describe something that has a value equivalent to what is being asked for it either in terms of money or effort. In that use, worth is an adjective.

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I see. Worth it is an adjective phrase. What is "worth" by itself then? Combined with it, it becomes an adjective. –  Jim Thio Jun 2 '12 at 14:21
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I think it's worth it sounds a lot like it worth it. I think that's where the confusion is. –  Jim Thio Jun 2 '12 at 14:22
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'Worth' can be both an adjective and a noun. –  Barrie England Jun 2 '12 at 14:25
    
this stuff worths $6000? –  Jim Thio Feb 3 at 8:46
    
No, you can't say that. –  Barrie England Feb 3 at 9:21
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Only the last one is correct.

"Worth" is classified as an Adjective and used as one. (Although it also acts differently from all of the Adjectives.)

In your particular example, "worth" is used as an Adjective but acts as a Preposition. That's why it's normally followed by a Noun, a Pronoun or a Gerund.

Ex.

It's worth a try.

It's worth it.

It's worth trying.

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What you will find is worth it, used to describe something that has a value equivalent to what is being asked for it either in terms of money or effort. In that use, worth is an adjective.

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If you're having trouble understanding this, then look at 'worth' as 'having value.' then: It's worth a try. is equivalent to (but NOT replaceable by) It has value to try OR There is value in trying

It's worth it. is equivalent to (but NOT replaceable by) It has value (roughly equivalent value).

It's worth trying. is equivalent to (but NOT replaceable by) It has value to try OR there is value in trying

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