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Coming from an articleless language, I often have problems with things like this:

take something into account

take something into an account

Are both phrases correct? If yes, is there a difference?

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2 Answers 2

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Take something into account/take account of something: notice or consider it, pay attention to it

"Take something into an account" is incorrect.

We will definitely take your contribution to this company into account while taking the decision.

We will definitely take into account your contribution to this company while taking the decision.

We will definitely take account of your contribution to this company while taking the decision.

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"Take something into an account" is not incorrect, it just means something different. e.g. "I will take payment into an account set up especially for the transaction". –  Matt Эллен May 24 '12 at 14:20
    
@MattЭллен Yes, you are correct. I overlooked that. –  user20934 May 25 '12 at 8:54
    
Correct me if I am wrong. But shouldn't it be "... in an account set up..."? –  user20934 May 25 '12 at 9:03
    
Both are valid. –  Matt Эллен May 25 '12 at 9:11

The idiom 'take into account' dates back to the mid 1500's, and means that something should be given consideration. Whereas to 'take smth into an account' is a direct instruction.

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