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To me, the word snob seems rather informal, although it appears in dictionaries, and I am unable to find anywhere on the internet a more formal word than snob.

Are there any sophisticated synonyms of snob? Snob is new to me and adding sophistication to it would make it more formal.

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A synonym, but that is more sophisticated than that of "snob" –  Olly Price May 19 '12 at 9:37
    
Related: Etymology of “snob” –  Callithumpian May 19 '12 at 19:17

7 Answers 7

up vote 8 down vote accepted

For a noun, elitist might work.

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Class-conscious has the same meaning as snobbish in its original form, but hardly anyone could genuinely be accused of class-consciousness nowadays. The commoner forms (based on riches, education or accent) don't really lend themselves to this formation; the closest I can think of is mindful of his income/background.

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To me, the word snob seems rather informal, although it appears in dictionaries, and I am unable to find anywhere on the internet a more formal word than snob.

Are there any sophisticated synonyms of snob? Snob is new to me and adding sophistication to it would make it more formal.

Well, it depends on the context, connotation, and to some extent also the period, in that a word that worked for this in 1812 might not be the best choice in 2012.

The OED has a lovely feature called its “historical thesaurus”, which allows you to chase down synonyms of each distinct sense of a word. Its short description is:

The Historical Thesaurus is a taxonomic classification of the majority of senses and lemmas in OED Online. It can be thought of as a kind of semantic index to the contents of the OED. The Historical Thesaurus can be used in OED Online to navigate around the dictionary by topic, find related terms, and explore the lexical history of a concept or meaning. Each class (a list of senses and lemmas sharing a particular meaning) is arranged chronologically, giving a historical overview of the concept represented by that class.

I’ll give the synonym sets for each of snob, pretentious, stuck-up, supercilious, and dandy, sorting the list of related-word entries within each by the date in which that particular sense entered English. (Just this once I’m going to skip any fancy formatting involving font changes, as that’s a great deal of work; pray forgive me.)

snob

  • gentleman of the first house 1611 — In humorous or slang phrases. gentleman of the first head, gentleman of the first house: used as terms of contempt. the (old) gentleman in black…
  • truck-knight 1625 — see quots.
  • Jack-gentleman 1667 — a man of low birth or manners making pretensions to be a gentleman, an insolent fellow, an upstart; so Jack-gentlewoman (rare).
  • parvenu 1787 — A person from a humble background who has rapidly gained wealth or an influential social position; a nouveau riche; an upstart, a social climber. Also in extended use.
  • gent 1842 — = gentleman n.; now only vulgar, exc. as applied derisively to men of the vulgar and pretentious class who are supposed to use the word, and as used in tradesmen's notices.
  • shoneena 1849 — (See quot. 1910 —.) Used (esp. attrib.) to indicate a person's inclination towards English rather than Irish standards and attitudes in cultural life, sport, etc.
  • snob 1848 — A person who admires and seeks to imitate, or associate with, those of higher social status or greater wealth; one who wishes to be regarded as a person of social importance.
  • cocktail 1854 — In extended use: a person assuming the position of a gentleman, but deficient in thorough gentlemanly breeding.
  • shoddyite 1865 — one who deals in shoddy; (also) one of the shoddy class.
  • got-up 1881 — an upstart.
  • shoddy 1904 — transf. and fig. Worthless material made to look like what is of superior quality; what is worthless and pretentious in art…

pretentious

  • taunt ?a1534 — (?) Haughty; ‘high and mighty’; ‘stuck-up’. In mod. dial. saucy, pert.
  • cocket 1537 — Proud, ‘stuck up’; pert, saucy; brisk; in mod. dial. merry.
  • cobbing 1599 — Playing the ‘cob’.
  • whalebone 1602 — as adj. Stiffened with strips of whalebone; made of or containing whalebone; also fig., ‘stiff’, affected.
  • airy 1606 — Assuming airs; making lofty pretensions. rare. In later use Sc. & U.S. regional.
  • flatuous 1630 — fig. = flatulent adj. 5.
  • fastuousa 1638 — Haughty, arrogant, pretentious, ostentatious.
  • vapouring 1647 — Acting or talking in a pretentious or high-flown manner.
  • hogen mogen 1648 — Usu. ironic or humorous. Powerful, mighty, grand. Now rare.
  • high and mighty 1654 — high and mighty, high-and-mighty: (a) formerly used as an epithet of dignity; (b) colloq. imperious, arrogant; affecting airs of…
  • flatulent 1658 — fig. Inflated or puffed-up, ‘windy’; empty, vain, pretentious.
  • fastigious 1670 — Like a fastigium; with gables. Also fig. Pretentious.
  • penseful 1788 — Conceited, giving oneself airs. Obs.
  • uppish 1789 — Inclined to be ‘stuck up’; putting on airs; aiming at gentility.
  • pensy 1790 — Giving oneself airs, conceited.
  • hoity-toity 1820 — Assuming, haughty, petulant, huffy.
  • glorified 1821 — colloq. That has undergone transformation into something glorious. (Often used sarcastically, e.g. to imply that a person of…
  • toploftical 1823 — High-flown, ‘high and mighty’, ‘highfalutin’, ‘stuck-up’; also lit. lofty, elevated.
  • stuck-up 1829 — Assuming an unjustified air of superiority, or pluming oneself unduly on real superiority; offensively pretentious.
  • pretentious 1832 — Attempting to impress by affecting greater importance or merit than is actually possessed; making an exaggerated outward display; ostentatious, showy.
  • jumped-up 1835 — jumped-up: that has newly or suddenly risen in status or importance (often with an implication of conceit or arrogance). Also transf.
  • sophomoric 1837 — Of or pertaining to, befitting or resembling, characteristic of, a sophomore; hence, pretentious, bombastic, inflated in style or manner; immature, crude, superficial.
  • highty-tighty 1847 — Petulant, huffy; supercilious.
  • snippy 1848 — dial. and colloq. Fault-finding, snappish, sharp; putting on airs, supercilious.
  • set-up 1856 — (a) established; in phr. well set-up (see quot. 1867 —; also in wider use); (b) dial. and colloq. conceited, ‘stuck up’; (c) of type, composed.
  • toplofty 1859 — Lofty in manner or character; elevated; haughty, ‘high and mighty’.
  • cock-a-loft 1862 — Affectedly lofty, stuck up.
  • superior 1864 — Applied ironically to persons of lofty, supercilious, or dictatorial manner or behaviour (or to their actions, etc.).
  • high-toned 1866 — Having a high moral tone; high-principled; expressing lofty sentiments; having dignified or superior manners. Also, stylish, pretentious. Also absol. Cf. high-tone adj.
  • pretensivea 1868 — Chiefly U.S. Pretentious, ostentatious, snobbish.
  • hunched 1870 — Having or bowed into a hump; hump-backed; fig. apt to ‘set one's back up’, ‘stuck-up’. Also with advbs.
  • snotty 1870 — dial. or slang. Angry, curt, short-tempered; pert, saucy, impudent; proud, conceited. Now esp. supercilious, aloof, ‘snooty’.
  • jackanapsian 1880 — having the character of a jackanapes.
  • uppity 1880 — attrib.
  • airified 1882 — Made airy; affectedly superior, given to assuming airs.
  • jackanapish 1884
  • high-tone 1897 — = high-toned adj.
  • sidy 1898 — Inclined to ‘put on side’; conceited.
  • head-in-air 1906 — head in the air. to go about with one's head in the air: to assume a pose of superiority. Hence head-in-air, designating either one…
  • posh 1914 — Smart, stylish, splendid, luxurious. Also (chiefly Brit.): typical of or belonging to the upper class; (affecting to be) superior or genteel; ‘snooty’, pretentious.
  • upstage 1918 — Superior or aloof in manner; ‘stuck-up’. Chiefly of persons.
  • snooty 1919 — Supercilious, haughty, conceited; affecting superiority, snobbish; ‘highbrow’, ‘stuck-up’. Occas., irritable, short-tempered.
  • high-hatted 1924
  • hincty 1924 — Conceited, snobbish, stuck-up.
  • snot-nosed 1941 — foul with nasal mucus; conceited; inexperienced and contemptible; = snotty-nosed adj.

stuck-up

  • taunt ?a1534 — (?) Haughty; ‘high and mighty’; ‘stuck-up’. In mod. dial. saucy, pert.
  • cocket 1537 — Proud, ‘stuck up’; pert, saucy; brisk; in mod. dial. merry.
  • cobbing 1599 — Playing the ‘cob’.
  • whalebone 1602 — as adj. Stiffened with strips of whalebone; made of or containing whalebone; also fig., ‘stiff’, affected.
  • airy 1606 — Assuming airs; making lofty pretensions. rare. In later use Sc. & U.S. regional.
  • flatuous 1630 — fig. = flatulent adj. 5.
  • fastuousa 1638 — Haughty, arrogant, pretentious, ostentatious.
  • vapouring 1647 — Acting or talking in a pretentious or high-flown manner.
  • hogen mogen 1648 — Usu. ironic or humorous. Powerful, mighty, grand. Now rare.
  • high and mighty 1654 — high and mighty, high-and-mighty: (a) formerly used as an epithet of dignity; (b) colloq. imperious, arrogant; affecting airs of…
  • flatulent 1658 — fig. Inflated or puffed-up, ‘windy’; empty, vain, pretentious.
  • fastigious 1670 — Like a fastigium; with gables. Also fig. Pretentious.
  • penseful 1788 — Conceited, giving oneself airs. Obs.
  • uppish 1789 — Inclined to be ‘stuck up’; putting on airs; aiming at gentility.
  • pensy 1790 — Giving oneself airs, conceited.
  • hoity-toity 1820 — Assuming, haughty, petulant, huffy.
  • glorified 1821 — colloq. That has undergone transformation into something glorious. (Often used sarcastically, e.g. to imply that a person of…
  • toploftical 1823 — High-flown, ‘high and mighty’, ‘highfalutin’, ‘stuck-up’; also lit. lofty, elevated.
  • stuck-up 1829 — Assuming an unjustified air of superiority, or pluming oneself unduly on real superiority; offensively pretentious.
  • pretentious 1832 — Attempting to impress by affecting greater importance or merit than is actually possessed; making an exaggerated outward display; ostentatious, showy.
  • jumped-up 1835 — jumped-up: that has newly or suddenly risen in status or importance (often with an implication of conceit or arrogance). Also transf.
  • sophomoric 1837 — Of or pertaining to, befitting or resembling, characteristic of, a sophomore; hence, pretentious, bombastic, inflated in style or manner; immature, crude, superficial.
  • highty-tighty 1847 — Petulant, huffy; supercilious.
  • snippy 1848 — dial. and colloq. Fault-finding, snappish, sharp; putting on airs, supercilious.
  • set-up 1856 — (a) established; in phr. well set-up (see quot. 1867 —; also in wider use); (b) dial. and colloq. conceited, ‘stuck up’; (c) of type, composed.
  • toplofty 1859 — Lofty in manner or character; elevated; haughty, ‘high and mighty’.
  • cock-a-loft 1862 — Affectedly lofty, stuck up.
  • superior 1864 — Applied ironically to persons of lofty, supercilious, or dictatorial manner or behaviour (or to their actions, etc.).
  • high-toned 1866 — Having a high moral tone; high-principled; expressing lofty sentiments; having dignified or superior manners. Also, stylish, pretentious. Also absol. Cf. high-tone adj.
  • pretensivea 1868 — Chiefly U.S. Pretentious, ostentatious, snobbish.
  • hunched 1870 — Having or bowed into a hump; hump-backed; fig. apt to ‘set one's back up’, ‘stuck-up’. Also with advbs.
  • snotty 1870 — dial. or slang. Angry, curt, short-tempered; pert, saucy, impudent; proud, conceited. Now esp. supercilious, aloof, ‘snooty’.
  • jackanapsian 1880 — having the character of a jackanapes.
  • uppity 1880 — attrib.
  • airified 1882 — Made airy; affectedly superior, given to assuming airs.
  • jackanapish 1884
  • high-tone 1897 — = high-toned adj.
  • sidy 1898 — Inclined to ‘put on side’; conceited.
  • head-in-air 1906 — head in the air. to go about with one's head in the air: to assume a pose of superiority. Hence head-in-air, designating either one…
  • posh 1914 — Smart, stylish, splendid, luxurious. Also (chiefly Brit.): typical of or belonging to the upper class; (affecting to be) superior or genteel; ‘snooty’, pretentious.
  • upstage 1918 — Superior or aloof in manner; ‘stuck-up’. Chiefly of persons.
  • snooty 1919 — Supercilious, haughty, conceited; affecting superiority, snobbish; ‘highbrow’, ‘stuck-up’. Occas., irritable, short-tempered.
  • high-hatted 1924
  • hincty 1924 — Conceited, snobbish, stuck-up.
  • snot-nosed 1941 — foul with nasal mucus; conceited; inexperienced and contemptible; = snotty-nosed adj.

supercilious

  • overmood OE — Pride, arrogance; overconfidence.
  • overmoody OE — Proud, haughty.
  • orgel ?c1200 — Proud, haughty, presumptuous.
  • dangerous ?c1225 — Difficult or awkward to deal with; haughty, arrogant; rigorous, hard, severe: the opposite of affable. Obs.
  • orgul a1275 — Proud, haughty, presumptuous.
  • orgulous c1275 — Proud, haughty.
  • fierce c1290 — Proud, haughty. Obs. Cf. French fier.
  • hautain 1297 — Holding or behaving oneself loftily; proud, arrogant: = haughty adj. 1.
  • highful 1297 — High; fig. haughty, proud.
  • squeamous c1325 — Distant, disdainful, fastidious.
  • deignous c1330 — Disdainful, proud, haughty.
  • digne 1340–70 — Having a great opinion of one's own worth; proud, haughty, disdainful; esp. in phr. as digne as ditch-water (cf. ‘stinking with pride’), as digne as the devil. Cf. dain adj.
  • disdainous c1374 — Full of or showing disdain; disdainful, scornful; proud, haughty.
  • sirly a1375 — Lordly, haughty, imperious.
  • lordly 1377 — Haughty, imperious, lofty, disdainful.
  • high-hearted 1398 — Courageous, high-spirited; in early use sometimes, Haughty, arrogant.
  • haught 1430 —-40 High in one's own estimation; bearing oneself loftily; haughty. arch.
  • fastidious c1440 — Full of pride; disdainful; scornful. Obs.
  • copped c1449 — Saucy, peevish, crabbed. Perh. primarily ‘heady’. Now Sc.
  • excellent c1450 — Assuming superiority, haughty, ‘superior’.
  • lofty c1485 — Haughty, overweening, proud. †Const. of.
  • heily 1513 — Haughty, proud.
  • hichty 1513 — High, lofty; fig. haughty.
  • stiff-necked 1526 — Having a stiff neck. Chiefly fig. of persons, with Biblical reference: Obstinate, stubborn, inflexible, haughty (cf. neck n. 1b). †Also of a horse: That will not obey the rein. Also transf.
  • supercilious 1528 — Haughtily contemptuous in character or demeanour; having or marked by an air of contemptuous superiority or disdain.
  • haughty 1530 — High in one's own estimation; lofty and disdainful in feeling or demeanour; proud, arrogant, supercilious. (Of persons, their action, speech, etc.)
  • taunt ?a1534 — (?) Haughty; ‘high and mighty’; ‘stuck-up’. In mod. dial. saucy, pert.
  • disdainful a1542 — Full of or showing disdain; scornful, contemptuous, proudly disregardful.
  • skeigh c1560 — transf. Of persons, esp. women. Hence, shy, coy, disdainful, proud.
  • high in the instep 1562 — Phrase. high in the instep, haughty, proud. Now dial.
  • queen-like ?1571 — Resembling, characteristic of, or befitting a queen (in various senses); queenly; spec. majestic, proud.
  • surly c1572 — Masterful, imperious; haughty, arrogant, supercilious. Obs.
  • coy 1581 — Of distant or disdainful demeanour. Also quasi- adv. Obs.
  • paughty a1586 — Haughty, proud; saucy, insolent, impertinent.
  • stey a1586 — transf. Unbending, upright. Also of a person: Reserved, haughty. Obs.
  • disdained 1598 — Characterized by disdain; disdainful, scornful. Obs. rare.
  • lordlike 1605 — Resembling, befitting, or characteristic of a lord; lordly. Now rare.
  • overly 1606 — Supercilious, imperious, overbearing, haughty. Now Eng. regional (E. Anglian).
  • stiff 1608 — Of bearing, manners, etc.: Unbending (expressing pride, coldness, displeasure, awkwardness, and the like); not easy or gracious; haughty.
  • surly-borne 1609 — haughty in bearing or demeanour.
  • lofty-minded 1611
  • sublimed 1611 — High and mighty. Obs.
  • high-sighted a1616 — having the sight directed aloft, supercilious.
  • patronizing 1619 — That patronizes a person or thing, esp. with an air or assumption of superiority; ostentatiously condescending.
  • stately a1625 — In milder sense: Showing a sense of superiority; repellently dignified; not affable or approachable. In recent use a euphemistic application of sense A. 1.
  • lording c1629 — That lords, in senses of the vb.
  • sublimated 1634 — Puffed up, haughty. Obs.
  • cavaliering 1642 — Playing the cavalier; haughty, domineering.
  • cavalier 1657 — Haughty, disdainful, supercilious.
  • uncondescending 1660 — (un- prefix 10.)
  • nose-in-the-air 1673 — with one's nose in the air and variants: in a haughty or disdainful manner; cf. 1c(a); so nose-in-the-air adj., haughty, disdainful.
  • uncondescensive 1681 — (un- prefix 7.)
  • condescending 1707 — That condescends; characterized by, or showing, condescension. Now, usually, Making a show, or assuming the air, of condescension; patronizing.
  • stiff-rumped 1728 — unbending, obstinate, proud.
  • ogertful 1755 — Proud; fastidious, affected.
  • splendid 1833 — Dignified, haughty, lordly.
  • touch-me-not 1852 — attrib. or as adj.
  • eye-glassy 1871 — Pertaining to or characteristic of one who wears an eye-glass; allusively, haughtily superior or contemptuous.
  • sniffy 1871 — Prone or inclined to sniff; scornful, contemptuous, disdainful; disagreeable, ill-tempered.
  • cavalierly 1876 — Characteristic of a cavalier; knightly; haughty.
  • snifty 1889 — slang (orig. and chiefly U.S.). Haughty, disdainful.
  • Olympian 1900 — In negative sense: aloof, remote; superior or condescending in manner.
  • ritzy 1920 — Of a person: haughty, snobbish. Now rare.
  • mugwumpish 1923 — Characteristic of a mugwump; esp. professing (political) disinterestedness. Also: pompous, snobbish.
  • blasé 1930 — Bored or unimpressed through over-familiarity; insensitive, supercilious.
  • stiff-arsed 1937 — (see quot. 1937).

dandy

  • miniona 1513 — A fastidious or effeminate man; a fop, a dandy. Obs.
  • prick-me-daintya 1529 — A person who is excessively or affectedly precise or fastidious about dress or personal appearance; a dandy. Now rare.
  • puppy ?1544 — colloq. (freq. derogatory). A foolish, conceited, or impertinent young man; (also) a young person, esp. one who is inexperienced or naive.
  • velvet-coat 1549 — ? a young fop.
  • skipjack 1554 — A pert shallow-brained fellow; a puppy, a whipper-snapper; a conceited fop or dandy. Now arch.
  • cock's-comb 1567 — A conceited fool; a fop. Now coxcomb n.
  • musk cat ?1567 — derogatory. A prostitute, a courtesan. Also: a foppish man (cf. musk-cod n. 2). Obs.
  • Adonis ?1571 — A beautiful or handsome young man. Cf. Venus n. 4.
  • coxcomb 1573 — A fool, simpleton (obs.); now, a foolish, conceited, showy person, vain of his accomplishments, appearance, or dress; a fop; ‘a superficial pretender to knowledge or accomplishments’ (Johnson).
  • Adon 1590 — A beautiful or handsome young man; (also) a fop, a dandy. Cf. Adonis n. 1.
  • foretop 1597 — One who wears a foretop; hence, a fop.
  • musk-cod 1600 — A heavily perfumed gentleman; a fop. Often as a derogatory form of address.
  • pretty fellow 1600 — a fashionable or stylish person, a fop, a dandy.
  • sparkc 1600 — A young man of an elegant or foppish character; one who affects smartness or display in dress and manners. Chiefly in more or less depreciatory use.
  • spangle-baby 1602 — a fop or dandy.
  • flash 1605 — A brilliant or ‘showy’ person; usually in contemptuous sense, one vain of his accomplishments or appearance, a coxcomb, fop. Obs.
  • barber-monger 1608 — a constant frequenter of the barber's shop, a fop.
  • dapperling 1611 — A little dapper fellow.
  • fantastica 1613 — One given to fine or showy dress; a fop. Obs.
  • feather-cock 1612 — a coxcomb.
  • trig 1612 — A trim, spruce fellow; a dandy, a coxcomb. Obs.
  • gimcrack 1623 — An affected showy person, a fop; in later use applied to women. (A term of contempt.) Obs.
  • cocklochea 1625 — A term of reproach or contempt: A mean fellow; ‘a silly coxcomb’.
  • Jack-a-dandy 1632 — A little pert or conceited fellow; a contemptuous name for a beau, fop, dandy.
  • satinist 1639 — A wearer of satin, a dandy.
  • fop 1676 — One who is foolishly attentive to and vain of his appearance, dress, or manners; a dandy, an exquisite.
  • prig 1676 — slang. A dandy, a fop. Now hist.
  • foplinga 1681 — A petty fop.
  • beau garçona 1687 — A handsome fellow; an exquisite, a fop.
  • beau 1687 — A man who gives particular, or excessive, attention to dress, mien, and social etiquette; an exquisite, a fop, a dandy.
  • shape 1688 — An empty fop, a dandy. Obs.
  • duke 1699 — slang. A man of showy demeanour or appearance.
  • smirk 1699 — slang. (See quot. 1699 —) Obs.
  • petty master 1706 — (a) a dandy, a fop; (b) a minor, secondary, or insignificant master. cf. petit maître n.
  • moppet 1707 — Used ironically of a man. Obs.
  • Tom Astoner 1707 — (see quots.).
  • dapper 1709 — as n. A dapper fellow. Obs.
  • petit maître 1711 — derogatory. An effeminate man; a dandy, a fop. Also fig. Now chiefly arch.
  • powder puff 1718 — A man who pays excessive attention to his appearance, a fop; an effeminate man (freq. with suggestion of homosexuality).
  • buck 1725 — A gay, dashing fellow; a dandy, fop, ‘fast’ man. Used also as a form of familiar address.
  • toupee 1727 — One who wears a toupee; a person of fashion; a beau, a spark, a buck. Obs.
  • toupet 1728 — transf. = toupee n. b. Obs.
  • toupet-coxcomb 1732 — attrib., as toupet-coxcomb, toupet-man, toupet-wig; toupet-titmouse n. the Crested Titmouse.
  • toupet-man 1748 — attrib., as toupet-coxcomb, toupet-man, toupet-wig; toupet-titmouse n. the Crested Titmouse.
  • jemmy 1753 — A dandy or fop; a finical fellow. Obs.
  • jessamy 1753 — A man who scents himself with perfume or who wears a sprig of jessamine in his buttonhole (?); a dandy, a fop. See jemmy n. 1b.
  • macaroni 1764 — A dandy or fop; spec. (in the second half of the 18th cent.) a member of a set of young men who had travelled in Europe and…
  • monkeyrony 1773 — = macaroni n. 2; (perh.) esp. a person who behaves mischievously like a monkey.
  • dandyc 1780 — One who studies above everything to dress elegantly and fashionably; a beau, fop, ‘exquisite’.
  • muscadin 1794 — Esp. in Paris in the 18th and 19th centuries: a dandy, a fop. Hence depreciatively: a member of a Moderate party (composed chiefly of young…
  • incroyable 1797 — A contemporary name for the French fop or dandy of the period of the Directory.
  • bang-up 1811 — A man of fashion; a dandy. Obs.
  • natty 1818 — A natty person. Obs. rare.
  • ruffian 1818 — A member of a group of dandies of the early 19th cent., noted for their rowdy behaviour and sporting prowess. Now hist.
  • exquisite 1819 — A person (usually a man) who is over-nice in dress, etc.; a coxcomb, dandy, fop.
  • heavy swell 1819 — (with pun on heavy swell in sense A. 8) a man of showy or impressive appearance; one dressed in the height of fashion.
  • marvellous 1819 — A dandy. Obs. rare.
  • bit of stuff 1828 — Predicatively, with epithet, of a person or a horse. Esp. in phr. bit of stuff: now chiefly in slang use, with or without epithet, of a woman or girl. Cf. bit n. 4f 4h.
  • fat 1832 — A presumptuous, conceited dandy; a fop.
  • majo 1832 — In Spain and Spanish-speaking countries: a man who dresses gaily, a dandy; an ostentatious young man; (originally) one from a lower social class (obs.).
  • beauty-man 1837 — a handsome fellow, a dandy, a lady's man.
  • squirta 1848 — colloq. A paltry or contemptible person; a whipper-snapper; a fop. Also spec. a child or young person. orig. U.S.
  • ineffable 1859 — One not to be mentioned or named; an anonymous journalist, etc.; an ‘unutterable’ swell.
  • guinea-pig 1860 — (See quot.)
  • masher 1875 — A fashionable young man of the late Victorian or Edwardian era, esp. one fond of the company of women; a dandy. Now hist.
  • mash 1879 — A sweetheart; a person who is the object of an infatuation or flirtation. Also: a dandy, a beau. Now rare.
  • dude 1883 — A name given in ridicule to a man affecting an exaggerated fastidiousness in dress, speech, and deportment, and very particular about…
  • dand 1886 — Slang or dial. abbreviation of dandy n. adj. adv.
  • heavy gunner 1890 — = heavy swell n.
  • posh 1890 — A dandy.
  • nut 1904 — Brit. slang. A fashionable or showy young man. Cf. knut n., nutty adj. 4. Now hist.
  • smoothie 1929 — A person who is ‘smooth’ (sense 7); one who is suave or stylish in conduct or appearance: usu. a man. Occas. with unfavourable sense: a slick but shallow or insinuating fellow, a fop.
  • fancy Dan 1943 — a dandy; a showy but ineffective worker or sportsman.
  • saga boy 1949 — a well-dressed lounger, a playboy.
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That's a dandy of an answer! –  J.R. May 21 '12 at 3:28

I can't think of another noun that's used to describe a person (other than snoot, but that goes in the less formal direction), but there are plenty of adjectives that fit the bill, such as:

pretentious, haughty, condescending

Armed with those, you could say something like:

Kelly is such a pretentious snob!

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I guess adjectives will have to suffice, thanks. –  Olly Price May 19 '12 at 9:45
    
Well, give it a chance - there are lots of smart people in the U.S. who haven't woken up yet! (Just because I'm drawing a blank doesn't mean there's not a good word.) –  J.R. May 19 '12 at 10:06
    
@ClarkKent: Oh, most definitely! (I only said that because of time zones - it's 6 AM here, and even earlier in other parts of the country.) I suspect a lot of non-U.S. EL&Uers are up and about, although I'm quite embarrassed now – I'd edit and change that to "North America" if I could... :^\ sorry.......... I didn't mean to sound like a pretentious snob! –  J.R. May 19 '12 at 10:19

Foppish, maybe?

resembling or befitting a fop;  excessively refined and fastidious in taste and manner. 
a man who is excessively vain and concerned about his dress, appearance, and manners. 
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For a phrase used by royalty, try toffee-nosed git. For example, The Daily Express quotes Duchess Sarah Ferguson as follows:

The hoodies I spoke to thought I was a toffee-nosed git, and were effing and blinding. But that’s fine. I wanted them to realise that not everybody is automatically going to think they are bad.

Some may think toffee-nosed git is less formal than snob. However, while wiktionary classes snob as informal, and git as slang, it does not classify toffee-nosed into either category.

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He does not suffer fools gladly. thefreedictionary

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