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What is a good word for saying that a person has reached a conclusion before properly formulating an argument?

For example, a logical train of thought would be 'My current computer is slow, this is decreasing my productivity, so therefore I would solve this by buying a new computer', whereas a person using this type of reasoning would say 'I want a new computer, let's think up reasons why this would be good. I know, I think I'm not working as well as I possibly could be.'

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"behaving typically"? –  Hellion May 18 '12 at 20:26
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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You could be said to be rationalizing your behavior or your decision.

One definition of rationalize is:

To devise self-satisfying but incorrect reasons for one's behavior.

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I had originally provided jumping to conclusions which fits the title, but does not fit the explanation given in the question body. Rationalize definitely is the right word for what's being described. –  Jim May 18 '12 at 21:14
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This is one definition of a foregone conclusion:

a conclusion which has preceded argument or examination; a predetermined conclusion.

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Reason for downvote? –  Callithumpian May 18 '12 at 20:49
    
This certainly isn't the way I use the phrase, but equally certainly that's no reason to downvote. –  TimLymington May 18 '12 at 21:25
    
@TimLymington: I'm also more familiar with the inevitable outcome use of the phrase, but thought this alternate use fit the question quite well. –  Callithumpian May 18 '12 at 21:28
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