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I read a paper, named A Hybrid Novelty Score and Its Use in Keystroke Dynamics-Based User Authentication. It states in section 3 that

For data sets, we used 10 realizations for parameter selection and 20 other realizations for parameter selection.

Does realization in this case mean simulation?

The following is the link of this paper: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0031320309001502

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Too localized. Voting to close, or migrate to SO. –  Kris May 2 '12 at 4:56
    
These terms have domain-specific definitions and one is not supposed to speculate on their meaning. In fact, the lexical may be far removed from the contextual in such cases. –  Kris May 2 '12 at 5:00
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I think you've mistyped the sentence, since it talks about "parameter selection" twice. –  David Schwartz May 2 '12 at 10:24
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Dia, please edit the question and add a link to the paper. Context such as title of paper may also help. Without context, your post might be not a real question or might be too localized. –  jwpat7 May 2 '12 at 14:38

3 Answers 3

The mentioned statement seems to refer to a logical/mathematical criterion, perhaps statistics. In such a context, the word 'realization' usually means an 'observed value' of some variable.

I wouldn't call that simulation. You may read a detailed description of this term in this respect at: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Realization_(probability)

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Often "realization" is a synonym of "implementation" — at least in terms of the Information Technology domain.

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Is it? Do you have examples of this? I can't think of any. –  Matt Эллен May 3 '12 at 9:35

As this Wiki link shows, realization in mathematics is a word ascribed to a transformation from the abstract space to the real world. For example, a random variable of tossing a die is an abstract mathematical quantity. When we roll the die ten times, we "realize" the random variable through the experiment, i.e., we cause it to take numbers.

In your question, the parameter is not a random quantity, but the same explanation holds: in one realization of a parameter, you assign a value of your choice to that parameter and collect the data set.

This is a more specialized term than simulation.

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