Take the 2-minute tour ×
English Language & Usage Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for linguists, etymologists, and serious English language enthusiasts. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I got an email from an instructor today. Towards the end of email she says:

"Here is to finishing off the semester in a positive way."

What does that mean?

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 13 down vote accepted

"Here's to ..." is a phrase used when making a toast. It means "Here is a toast to ...", at which point it is customary to raise your glass. The phrase has a life of its own, used by a speaker or writer expresses a situation that calls for a toast-like salute to something.

share|improve this answer
    
Ooh, downvote with no comment. Here is to the plus-voters out there! All you others: do not hate, emulate. :) –  Kaz Apr 25 '12 at 21:15
    
There you go - have my upvote to counterbalance the dark force. Not that the other answers are wrong - but they give no explanation as to how the expression arose in the first place, so they're incomplete. –  FumbleFingers Apr 26 '12 at 0:33
    
It may also be related to the the expression hear, hear. As is discussed in this wikipedia article: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Here_here –  Brad Apr 28 '12 at 10:28

It is a way of expressing a wish for success. In other words: "I hope you will finish off the semester in a positive way".

share|improve this answer
    
+1, Your answer is concise and perfect. –  user19148 Apr 25 '12 at 20:19

"Here is to..." or "Here's to..." is a friendly way of saying "I am looking forward to..."

Another example: A salesman may say at the end of the year: "Here's to another great year of sales"

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.