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Can you call a cheeseburger a hamburger? I am eating self-made ones.

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closed as general reference by MrHen, J.R., Hugo, Matt Эллен, kiamlaluno Apr 24 '12 at 14:07

This question is too basic; it can be definitively and permanently answered by a single link to a standard internet reference source designed specifically to find that type of information.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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By the way, you want to call them "homemade" instead of "self-made". –  slhck Apr 22 '12 at 17:51
    
Welcome to the site. This question is too basic; it can be definitively and permanently answered by a single link to a standard internet reference source designed specifically to find that type of information. Next time please check a dictionary first: "cheeseburger: hamburger with melted cheese". –  Hugo Apr 23 '12 at 6:39
    
Everybody is saying you can, don't you think it is better if you can? Otherwise it would be neurotic. –  user128360 Apr 23 '12 at 7:08
    
@user128360: Better if you can? I don't know about that. I think it tastes the same, no matter what you call it. "I like mine with lettuce and tomato..." –  J.R. Apr 23 '12 at 9:25

2 Answers 2

Technically, a cheeseburger is a specific form of hamburger.

But, if someone asks for a hamburger and they get a cheeseburger, they will probably be upset at not getting what they wanted. That is, the term 'hamburger' usually is used for the specific plain version, not for any kind of hamburger, at least with respect to added cheese; a cheeseburger is not a hamburger.

So you can call a cheeseburger a hamburger in a burger construction manual, but not when accepting orders in a restaurant.

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@AngloSaxon: as interesting as that question is, why are you asking here on my answer to a question about cheeseburger? Is it because both have something to do with food? –  Mitch Apr 22 '12 at 16:32
    
Yes. Reading your answer I understand you are interested in food questions, so you could add a comment on 'paprika'. –  Xavier Hernández Balcázar Apr 22 '12 at 17:10
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@AngloSaxon: all these comments are irrelevant here. Please continue at that question. –  Mitch Apr 22 '12 at 18:09

In America at least, you could refer to both as "burgers".

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How about referring to them as sandwiches? –  user128360 Apr 23 '12 at 13:35
    
This would be problematic. Everybody knows they are sandwiches, but they are only "technically" sandwiches and not "really" sandwiches. On a menu board it would be rare to see "burgers" listed under "sandwiches". –  Mark Beadles Apr 23 '12 at 15:26

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