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Legolas prodded him across the bridge ("You'll beg for mercy, but you'll get none from me, oho no!"), up the beech-lined path ("You'll never work in this country again, I'll bloody well see to that!") Source.

What's the meaning of the expression "I'll bloody well see to that!"? It means something like "I'll make sure of that!" I am not sure what it really means.

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I think this is general reference. It just asks what "see to [sth]" means, with an irrelevant bloody [well] thrown in. –  FumbleFingers Apr 16 '12 at 3:10

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The use of the word "bloody" goes back to references about some aristocratic rowdies in England who drank to excess and whose behavior was accordingly foul. One suggests that it is like using the F word in certain environments whereas at the pub, the poor drunk blokes wouldn't bat an eye!

Used in the manner you presented, it intensifies the meaning of "I'll see to that!"

See http://www.straightdope.com/columns/read/1420/whats-the-origin-of-the-british-slang-word-blood for more information on uses of "bloody."

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According to query.nytimes.com/gst/…, "Bloody" may have been a corruption/contraction of "By Our Lady". –  SarekOfVulcan Apr 16 '12 at 14:59

After extracting the emphatic bloody well (meaning roughly definitely), you're left with I'll see to that.

From the OED's entry on see:

To take special care about (a matter.) Chiefly, to see to it, to make sure that (something is done).

Taken as a whole, you seem to already understand the intent: I'll make sure of that!

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Yes, it does mean "I'll make sure of that!"

"I'll see to it..." implies that the person is going to use his position or authority to do something to ensure that Legolas will never "work in this country again".

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