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I understand that for common usage these words have distinct meanings. However in mathematics there is a process called convolution, and sometimes you hear "you need to convolve X" and sometimes "you need to convolute X". Similarly with related terms e.g. "to deconvolute the data" and "to deconvolve the data".

From a bit of Google snooping I get the feeling that they are simply interchangeable, much like oriented/orientated. (Although the spellchecker flags "deconvolute" but not "deconvolve" in the above paragraph). Indeed, searching "convolve" in Wikipedia redirects you to the Convolution article I linked above.

Are these words interchangeable? If so, is there so regional difference between their usage? I am compelled to snobbishly adhere to British English, after all.

EDIT: The answer of user545424 doesn't convince me. For instance, there's an incomplete debate amongst engineers here with one saying that convolute is more common, and others mentioning that convolve doesn't even appear in dictionaries. A Google Ngrams search also suggests that convolute is more prevalent, despite a decline in that and a rise in convolve. However, these last two cases are inconclusive because of the split between the common context of these words and the mathematical procedure named as such, where I'm only interested in the latter.

Does anyone else care to present an argument backed up with sources?

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I detest 'orientated' The proper word is 'oriented.' Something that has been oriented has an orientation. And it appears that somebody (or lots of somebodies), having heard 'orientation', then tried to back out a verb and came up with 'orientate'. –  Jim Apr 13 '12 at 7:45
    
@Jim Neither is universally proper. Both are in dictionaries and both are accepted; but to varying degrees in different countries. I wanted to know if the same situation existed for convolve/convoluted.That "orientate" probably came about as a back-formation from "orientation" is irrelevant. –  Verge Apr 18 '12 at 5:06
    
I still detest it. –  Jim Apr 18 '12 at 6:00
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2 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The mathematical procedure is called convolution or deconvolution, and you convolve or deconvolve two functions; you do not convolute or deconvolute two functions.

Outside of math convolve and convolute mean pretty much the same thing:

to coil up; form into a twisted shape.

Although deconvolute and deconvolve are not in the dictionary, I imagine you could use them colloquially as a verb to mean:

to uncoil

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+1 -- but please, readers, do not use deconvolve except in a technical context! At best it is needlessly complex; at worst, obfuscatory. –  Charles Apr 13 '12 at 14:31
    
at worst, it is convoluted. –  user545424 Apr 13 '12 at 17:08
    
@user545424 Can you please back up your first sentence? Also, see my edit. –  Verge Apr 18 '12 at 5:21
    
@Verge, from the NOAD, convolute is a biology term meaning, "rolled longitudinally upon itself, as a leaf in the bud," while convolve is a rare word carrying the primary meaning, to "roll or coil together; entwine," and the secondary meaning in mathematics "combine (one function or series) with another by forming their convolution." Also search for convolute and convolve on the Wikipedia page—it never uses convolute as a verb. –  zpletan Apr 18 '12 at 11:37
    
Online links: convolve—oxforddictionaries.com/definition/convolve convolute—oxforddictionaries.com/definition/convoluted –  zpletan Apr 18 '12 at 11:38
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Setting aside the fact that "convolve" is the usual mathematical term defined for this process, there is something else that tips the scales clearly in favor of "convolve" over "convolute":

Convoluted is an adjective.

Convolved is a verb (both transitive and intransitive).

As such, while you might say that "signal A is convolved with signal B", to say that "signal A is convoluted with signal B" would be butchery of the English language. (And using convoluted as and adjective isn't terribly useful, unless you wanted to complain about the convoluted process.) So convolve and its associated forms appear to fit the process of convolution, and signal processing and math in general, better.

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