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This is what I want to express:

I want to get to know more algorithms that have been created.

I have thought about changing the sentence into

I want to gain a better insight into algorithms that have been created.

But it seems inappropriate.

Any better phrase (or single word) to replace get to know?

(Or better way to construct the sentence?)

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7 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Any better phrase (or single word) to replace get to know?

My first thought was learn and my second was discover.

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Firstly, get to know and gain a better insight into are not quite the same.

Your choice of the right phrase depends on the depth/ extent to which you want to know.

Know would be the simplest option:

I want to know more algorithms ...
(Are there any more than what I now know? If so, what are their names? - You now do not know of more; don't know if any exist.)

learn, explore, study, master, ... would be good alternatives of various degrees.

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If you were talking about people, not algorithms, I'd recommend "become familiar with."

However, for algorithms, I'd be more inclined to use:

better understand the algorithms

or,

more fully comprehend the algorithms

I'm sure there are other viable alternatives, too.

My dictionary defines comprehend as grasp mentally; understand, so it seems like an especially apt word.

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You could try:

I want to become more familiar with more algorithms that have been created.

I am not sure of you're meanings but it sounds like you want to increase the number of algorithms you know, so maybe this might work:

I want to be aware of more algorithms that have been created.

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Some options are:

  1. to familiarize oneself [better];
  2. to acquaint oneself [better]; or
  3. to master (a subject matter or process).

I would use better rather than more, if you must use an adverb, because more, as a previous commenter mentioned, could be thought to modify the number of algorithms rather than your familiarity with them.

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I would've said learn about.

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To express understanding something in its fullness, I've always liked the word grok:

grok, v. : to understand profoundly and intuitively

So: I want to grok all of the applicable algorithms.

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