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Every day, I get emails from Ennatought. Mails sometimes say for my type (The Investigator): "Become grounded in your body". Here is one such message:

Try this practice and therapeutic strategy today: Become grounded in your body and allow grieving and processing of feelings, especially rejection and futility. When you are present to these issues, do you notice anything shift in yourself?

So what does it mean exactly? What should I make of this sentence?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

To become grounded in your body is a New Age-ish expression meaning, mainly, to stop over-thinking things — fighting natural processes with your mind — and allow your body to take over and process emotions at a more visceral level, thereby allowing them to work themselves out. Another way to put this is "Get out of your head."

I make no claims that this process actually works, but this is what the phrase means in context.

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When you are grounded you are not allowed to go out. So, become grounded in your body in the context you give could be interpreted as "Concentrate on the reality of here and now, don't let your mind wander and allow grieving..."

EDIT: Because the above answer is apparently wrongly expressed, the meaning of the sentence is: Concentrate on the reality of here and now and don't let your mind wander. Allow grieving and processing of feelings, especially rejection and futility.

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I got it except your last sentence. You meant that don't allow grieving or only allow grieving? –  dino Apr 12 '12 at 8:24
    
"don't" qualifies only "let your mind". "Allow" is positive, just like in the original sentence. –  Irene Apr 12 '12 at 8:29
    
Sorry, but this is the opposite of what the phrase means. The quote specifically states that you should "become grounded ... and allow grieving" –  Robusto Apr 12 '12 at 9:35
    
@Robusto: Umm... that's what I mean when I say that allow is positive. Don't was intended to qualify only let. –  Irene Apr 12 '12 at 9:38
    
Ah, OK. Sorry I misinterpreted your meaning. Luckily I was in time to recall my downvote. –  Robusto Apr 12 '12 at 9:44

If you feel the need for one of their expensive courses you might first try one of these cheap and simple solutions. Which ensure that your body will be safely grounded at all times.

enter image description here

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2  
I enjoy the humor, but is this really an appropriate answer? –  horatio Apr 12 '12 at 19:49
    
@horatio - it makes as much sense as the message the question is about! –  mgb Apr 12 '12 at 20:50

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