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In the English language, what adjective can be used to describe the underlying personality of a person saying

Tell the gossipers and liars, I'll see them in the fires

(Taken from Johnny Cash)

From what I have researched righteous comes close but as the person in question assumes damnation himself (he/she will see them in hell) it is not adequate.

The theme (I'll see you in hell) seems fairly common in English literature and/or movies. Usually (but not always) presented with a positive connotation related to a somehow damned hero figure so I assume this is a common concept with an adjective that can be associated with it.

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Thanks for the comment. Let me try to clarify: The characteristic is the serious or humorous acceptance of own damnation while still carrying out whatever plan it was the person came to fulfill, mixed with a dash of being upbeat about it. The person is not moaning about his own demise but rather accepts and/or welcomes it as a part of proceeding with his plan. –  0x90 Apr 9 '12 at 17:39
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3 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Devil-may-care.

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George Bernard Shaw fans might call such a person a "Devil's Disciple," after the title character who playfully bestows that moniker on himself:

JUDITH (angrily). I would rather have a husband whom everybody respects than—than—

RICHARD. Than the devil's disciple. You are right; but I daresay your love helps him to be a good man, just as your hate helps me to be a bad one.

However, that term hasn't made its way into the vernacular as of yet, not officially.

"The characteristic is the serious or humorous acceptance of own damnation while still carrying out whatever plan it was the person came to fulfill, mixed with a dash of being upbeat about it."

Hmmmm... that describes Shaw's Richard Dudgeon to a T.

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Rakehell (or rakehelly) can be used as an adjective meaning profiligate or dissolute. Dictionary.reference.com definition Some dictionaries list it as an archaic word, but there is a rock band named "The Rakehells," so it seems to still be in use.

As a noun rakehell is a man who is licentious or dissolute.

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