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What is the meaning of the expression stuck in a barb wire snare? I heard it in a song but I can't find the explanation and I can't figure out what it means.

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closed as off-topic by FumbleFingers, MετάEd, Hellion, Kristina Lopez, tchrist Jul 15 '13 at 19:59

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Sylvia Plath used the phrase in her poem "Daddy" (written in 1962). There are lots of analyses available for that poem. –  JLG Apr 6 '12 at 12:39
Ever since barbed wire was first mass-produced in the late 1870s, the form barb wire has always been vanishingly rare. –  FumbleFingers Jul 14 '13 at 23:15
This question appears to be off-topic because it is about song lyrics –  Hellion Jul 15 '13 at 16:05
Unless the song means that someone is literally caught in a snare made of barbed wire, I'd hazard a guess that it's some sort of symbolic and/or emotional snare - and since it's "made" of barbed wire, it means you'll get hurt worse (or end up scarred) trying to free yourself from the snare. –  Kristina Lopez Jul 15 '13 at 17:57

1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

A snare is a small wire noose used for trapping wild animals.

Barb wire (or barbed wire) is a twisted wire with sharp points (barbs) sticking out from it, typically used for fencing in livestock.

To be stuck in a snare of barbed wire would be most unpleasant, as not only are you trapped in a noose, but one that is jabbing painfully into you.

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