Take the 2-minute tour ×
English Language & Usage Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for linguists, etymologists, and serious English language enthusiasts. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is there a expression that describes the situation where you accidentally hit some combination of keys in a software application, and you discover that it triggers some useful keyboard shortcut that you didn't know about, but you don't know what the exact key combination was, and you aren't able to reproduce it?

share|improve this question

closed as not constructive by FrustratedWithFormsDesigner, JSBձոգչ, MrHen, Mitch, RegDwigнt Apr 10 '12 at 22:21

As it currently stands, this question is not a good fit for our Q&A format. We expect answers to be supported by facts, references, or expertise, but this question will likely solicit debate, arguments, polling, or extended discussion. If you feel that this question can be improved and possibly reopened, visit the help center for guidance.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

5  
A fluke –  Jim Apr 5 '12 at 17:34
    
You could try reading the Help files. :) –  JLG Apr 5 '12 at 17:38
1  
How about "magic shortcut"? Or "mystery shortcut"? –  FrustratedWithFormsDesigner Apr 5 '12 at 18:06
    
I guess I should ask for the word for the opposite: the cat steps on the keyboard and the computer shuts down! I don't know what she hit, but I hope she doesn't do it again. –  thursdaysgeek Apr 6 '12 at 3:33

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I propose Heisenstroke! From the lineage of the Heisenbug. You heard it here first.

share|improve this answer

As to the first part, serendipitous.

ser·en·dip·i·ty  (noun)
1. an aptitude for making desirable discoveries by accident.
2. good fortune; luck.

As for not being able to reproduce it, that's a little tougher. Maybe this:

dis·com·fi·ture (noun)
1. disconcertion; confusion; embarrassment.
2. frustration of hopes or plans.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 because in trying to minus one I discovered that it fits the feel of the situation quite well. –  user14070 Apr 6 '12 at 13:28

We used to call them "happy accidents" and when users called the help desk wondering how to undo/redo what they did, we told them to RTFM.

share|improve this answer

Perhaps tip of one's fingers, as in "Oh drat, what was that keystroke? I swear, it's on the tip of my fingers!"

share|improve this answer
3  
That implies (to me) that the person who did it once knew and then forgot. –  FrustratedWithFormsDesigner Apr 5 '12 at 18:29

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.