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Is there a word or common phrase that expresses the idea that two works have some but not all authors in common?

For example if I have these papers

(1)How to Count Red Bottles, Gee M. S., Queen H. R. H., Bacon K., Damon M.
(2)Bottle Counting Meta-analysis, Queen H. R. H., Damon M., Goldblum G., Kendal F.

Is there a word or idiomatic way to say

Partially same authors argue in (2) that...

Partially same authors does not seem a common phrase after searching Google.

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migrated from tex.stackexchange.com Mar 31 '12 at 13:39

This question came from our site for users of TeX, LaTeX, ConTeXt, and related typesetting systems.

    
Hi texr. I have radically edited your question. I think what I have put means the same as what you had. If you disagree, feel free to roll back. I changed it because your question looked off topic for this site, but this way it seems on topic. –  Matt Эллен Apr 1 '12 at 11:44

3 Answers 3

I'd recommend you explicitly name the specific authors who overlap.

J. Jones and S. Smith, co-authors of (1), argue in (2) that...

This leaves no room for confusion or misattribution.

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You could say "an overlapping set of authors", or "a paper with overlapping authors".

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3  
It all sounds a bit "forced" to me, but if OP really thinks its important to mention the overlap, I'd go for something like "some of those authors, together with others, argue in (2) that...". Presumably the context would make it clear who "those" referred to, or could be made to do so. –  FumbleFingers Mar 31 '12 at 14:11

What about using et al.?

Assuming the first and second papers support each other, I might say:

Brown and Black, et al., argued in [1] that paradox is meaningless. In [2], they reinforced this conclusion, by proving that trees falling in the woods do indeed make noise, irrespective of the forest's human population.

As a footnote, I might handle this differently, depending on:

a. the number of co-authors in each paper,
b. the number of authors who overlap,
c. whether or not the overlapping authors are the primary authors, and
d. whether the two stances supported or disagreed with each other.

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