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I updated a User Guide, and according to my company's processes I have to send the document with tracked changes to our operations. So I wrote this email:

Dear operations,

Please take a look at the attached updated User Guide and let me know blah blah.

Blah,

Blah Blah.

Does the sentence sound right or had I better rephrase it so as to avoid "attached updated"? For example,

Please find the updated User Guide attached and let me know blah blah.

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2 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Both versions are grammatical.

Please take a look at the attached updated User Guide and let me know...

There is no rule which prohibits the use of two adjectives in a row before the noun they modify, as is the case with updated and attached here.

Please find the updated User Guide attached and let me know...

Here, attached is an elliptic form of a subordinate relative clause. The full form is:

Please find the updated User Guide which is attached and let me know...

Which one you will eventually choose depends on your stylistic preferences.

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The string of adjectives is fine, but I think you should either put a comma after Guide or start a new sentence after Guide. (Google: comma before conjunction in compound sentences).

Please take a look at the attached updated User Guide, and let me know blah blah.

or

Please take a look at the attached updated User Guide. Let me know blah blah.

You could also reword it:

Please take a look at the updated User Guide, which is attached, and let me know blah blah.

Or

I have attached the updated User Guide. Please let me know blah blah.

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